International Conference on
Geology & Earth Science

May 2-4, 2018 | Rome, Italy

Program Schedule

  • Keynote Speaker

    Time:
    09:30 - 10:00

    Title

    Title: Natural or Human Disasters? Authonomy of the Science from Politics, Facts, Needs and Challenges in Italy

    Benedetto De Vivo
    Pegaso University & Benecon Competence Center, Italy
    Biography
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    Biography

    Benedetto De Vivo
    Pegaso University & Benecon Competence Center, Italy

    Benedetto De Vivo is Full Prof. of Exploration and Environmental Geochemistry at Pegaso University & Benecon Competence Center, Napoli, Italy; retired from University of Napoli Federico II; Adjunct Professor at Virginia Tech, USA and Nanjing University, China; Chief Editor of GEEA (Geochemistry: Exploration, Environment, Analysis); Fellow of Mineralogical Society of America. Has published 300 papers (most of them on top internationally referred journals); 30 educational publications; 30 Monographs, 7 text books (in Italian); and has edited 36 special volumes on international peer review journals books (in Italian) in geochemical prospecting and environmental geochemistry.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Benedetto De Vivo
    Pegaso University & Benecon Competence Center, Italy

    As everybody knows, probably, in Italy after the tragedy of L’Aquila earthquake, scientists of Italy's Great Risk National Commission at Civil Protection Department were indicted not on their inability to forecast the magnitude-6.3 earthquake that struck L'Aquila in April 2009, but on their provision of “incomplete, imprecise and contradicting information”. At the end of the 3rd level of Justice, all the scientists were acquitted, and only one was sentenced as guilty. The case highlights, on my view, a central problem in Italy, but also in other Countries - the incestuous relationships between science and politics, as often the scientists prefer to go along with, and even to defend, political decisions, rather than to act independently. In addition to the tragic case of L’Aquila earthquake, other examples of this behaviour, include, e.g., the building of the largest civil hospital (known as the Ospedale del Mare) in southern Italy on the slope of the Vesuvius active volcano and plan to dispose radioactive waste near the southern town of Scanzano Jonico, plan which luckily at the end was cancelled. I’m strongly convinced that scientists should speak loudly and clearly when insane decisions, which put at risk human lives, are taken by politicians (under the coverage of friendly scientists), because the value to preserve and to protect primarily is human life, and dealing with nature, should be always privileged the precaution principle, abandoning arrogant attitudes and the blind faith in the infallible technology.

    Keynote Speaker

    Time:
    10:00 - 10:30

    Coffee Break- 10:30 - 10:45

    Title

    Title: Multihazard Analysis of Landslides using Remote Sensing, Hydrological and Geomechanical Tools – Case Study of the 2009 Padang Earthquake

    Darren Chian Siau Chen
    National University of Singapore, Singapore
    Biography
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    Biography

    Darren Chian Siau Chen
    National University of Singapore, Singapore

    Dr. Darren Chian Siau Chen obtained his PhD from the University of Cambridge, UK. One of his core research interests is on earthquake engineering (geomechanics and engineering geology). He was funded by the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) to carry out reconnaissance missions at the 2009 Padang, 2011 Tohoku and 2016 Muisne earthquakes. Dr. Chian has attended several international conferences as keynote and distinguished speaker in 14 cities. He was interviewed by the media from Singapore, USA, UK, Denmark and India. Dr. Chian’s research work on catastrophe modelling at NUS led to his award of the prestigious Top 10 Innovators Under 35 in Asia by the MIT Technology Review in 2016.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Darren Chian Siau Chen
    National University of Singapore, Singapore

    Conventional hazard maps are often based on probabilistic approaches that deviate from physical geological and engineering principles. A case study of the massive landslides following the 2009 Padang earthquake will be demonstrated in this presentation, adopting tools using 1) remote sensing for satellite imagery, terrain and rainfall estimates, 2) hydrological techniques to demarcate locations of soil subject to high water saturation, as well as 3) geomechanical analysis considering the equilibrium of forces, ground conditions as well as slope gradient. The outcome is a more robust analysis of susceptibility to landslides as compared to probabilistic based hazard maps.

    Sessions:
    Environmental Geology & Groundwater and Hydrogeology & Marine Geosciences and Oceanography

    Time:
    10:45 - 11:10

    Title: Trace Metals Concentration in Eastern part of Sulaibikhat Bay Adjacent to Kuwait University - Shuwaikh - and their Effect on Foraminifera

    Amal Jaafer Hussein Alkandari
    Ministry Of Health, Kuwait

    Biography
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    Biography

    Amal Jaafer Hussein Alkandari
    Ministry Of Health, Kuwait

    Amal J Alkandari was born in 4th Nov, 1967. She completed her PhD at Arabian Gulf University in Environmental Marine Science. She completed her Masters degree in Kuwait University in 2008. Now she is a Health Investigator in Ministry of Health in Kuwait.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Amal Jaafer Hussein Alkandari
    Ministry Of Health, Kuwait

    The area under investigation is located in the eastern part of Sulibikhat Bay adjacent to Kuwait University in Shuwaikh. The area includes a wide mesotidal flat and low energy zone which is covered with mud and muddy sediments highly affected by pollutants from sewage discharges. Part of the area has been rehabilitated by removing wrecked ships and contaminated sediments. The objectives is to find the concentrations of trace metals in the area and their effect on foraminifera and to identify different environmental factors (parameters) that control the distribution and deformation of foraminiferal organisms. Sixty sediment samples were collected from 30 stations during the winter 2006 and summer 2006 seasons. Temperature, salinity, pH, dissolved oxygen, turbidity and grain size were studied as factors which would affect foraminiferal species. All sediment samples were analyzed for trace metals concentration and foraminiferal distribution and deformation. Concentrations of eleven trace metal elements (Fe, Pb, Hg, Si, Mn, Zn, Cd, Cu, Cr, Ni, and V) and total organic carbon were analyzed for geochemical studies. The study showed that trace metals in sediments were highly contaminated by total organic carbon, zinc, chromium, cadmium, nickel and vanadium. Lead, manganese, and copper have increased above their normal limits. Iron concentration decreased after removing the wrecked ships. Mercury and silicon concentrations have not been studied before. Areas close to the shoreline were most polluted with trace metals and total organic carbon, and had very few or no foraminiferal species. Rotaliina, Miliolina, Textulariina, and Lagenina were identified as foraminiferal suborders. Foraminiferal density and diversity were higher during the winter than the summer season as far as environmental stress is concerned. The deformed foraminiferal species during the winter and summer seasons were 0.89 % and 0.71 %, respectively. The study showed that the area was highly stressed, which had an adverse effect on foraminifera. To avoid future environmental problems, this study recommended that it has to isolate the sewage from Shuwaikh industrial area, treat domestic sewage before discharge into the sea, provide environmental techniques for controlling oil spills, and activate Kuwaiti Law 12 of 1964 regarding the prevention of pollutants by oil spills in navigable waters.

    Time:
    11:10 - 11:35

    Title: Neotectonics as a tool to explore for groundwater in semi-arid environments, case of the fractured Karoo aquifers in the Eastern Cape Province

    Kakaba Madi
    University of Fort Hare, South Africa

    Biography
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    Biography

    Kakaba Madi
    University of Fort Hare, South Africa

    Dr K Madi obtained his BSc Hons (Geology) from the University of Lubumbashi (Democratic Republic of Congo) and his PhD (Geology) from the University of Fort Hare (Republic of South Africa). Dr Madi previously worked for the Ministry of Mines and Geology in the DRC-Zambia Copper Belt as exploration geologist. His PhD research was based on the application of neotectonics for the exploration of groundwater in the South African Karoo aquifers. He currently lectures structural geology and geochemistry at the University of Fort Hare. He is member of the Geological Society of South Africa, and is registered with the South African Council for Natural Scientific Professions.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Kakaba Madi
    University of Fort Hare, South Africa

    Finding productive boreholes in the fractured Karoo aquifers is not easy and requires implication of other techniques to ascertain the potentiality of groundwater. The Eastern Cape, second largest of South Africa's nine provinces, hosts rocks of the Karoo Supergroup over a large area and few rocks of the Cape Supergroup. Literature review, remote sensing, examination of seismic data, field observations, and location of springs and hot springs, magnetic and electromagnetic survey, and vertical electric sounding (VES) were used to identify and characterize neotectonic belts that can be targeted for groundwater exploration. Results indicate that the Eastern Cape Province can be subdivided in four zones with regard to neotectonics. The southern, the eastern, northern neotectonic belts, and the central inactive belt. The southern neotectonic belt has some faults that were reactivated during the Quaternary, the eastern neotectonic belt has been affected by a surface uplift that might have generated some fractures (e.g. Fort Beaufort Fracture) in the Karoo during the last five million years, the northern neotectonic belt stretches over a big seismic belts has seven hot springs, and the central inactive belt with no neotectonic markers. Magnetic and electromangnetic survey point to the occurrence of a fault hosted in the northern neotectonic belt. Vertical electrical sounding identified some fractures in the southern neotectonic belt. The three neotectonic belts (southern, eastern and northern) can be considered as potential targets to explore for groundwater.

    Time:
    11:35 - 12:00

    Title: A Study on Criterion of Slope Failure Considering Geology and Rainfall Pattern

    Takahara Toshiyuki
    Kanazawa University, Japan

    Biography
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    Biography

    Takahara Toshiyuki
    Kanazawa University, Japan

    Toshiyuki Takahara was born in Aug. 2nd, 1968. In 1997, he received Doctorate of engineering from Hokkaido University. He worked as a researcher and Engineer in OYO Corporation. He worked as an Assistant Professor in Kanazawa University. He is a Vice chairman of council for slope failure and its damages in Ishikawa Pref in 1995. In 2016, he is an Advisor or Hokuriku branch Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Takahara Toshiyuki
    Kanazawa University, Japan

    To avoid human damages by slope failure caused by local short heavy rain, which is increasing by influences of global warming, the information of damage potential of slope failure is published from Japanese Meteorological Agency against each 5km mesh in all around Japan. This information, based on relationship between hourly rainfall and Soil Water Index, is foundation of evacuation instructions or orders from local government. However, the capture or hitting ratio of the information is very low; only 20% against past 10 years, because the SWI cannot express the actual soil water in slopes. Moreover, the 5km mesh is also not enough since its classification is not based on geological features, so the landslide or steep slope failure are depend on geological features deeply . We have installed the three ground water level recorders developed by Dr. Ueno into different geological slopes in Ishikawa prefecture, Japan. This means that we obtain the actual ground water levels in slopes on damage potential zone, and the relationships between hourly rainfall and the actual water level in slopes are modeled as parallel tank model. Then we calculated new critical line based on Radial Basis Function Networks by using the estimated actual ground waters and past 10 years rainfall data. Finally, we compared the slope damage records and new critical lines for each geological classification. As the results, the capture ratio is improved over 50%, and the estimation of damage potential of unaffected slopes maybe improved by adoption of geological zoning.

    Time:
    12:00 - 12:25

    Title: Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cells To Combat Climate Change

    Sam H. Y. Hsu
    City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

    Biography
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    Biography

    Sam H. Y. Hsu
    City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

    Sam H. Y. Hsu's research interests involve the material design, synthesis, processing, imaging, spectroscopy and solar energy application, aiming to explore fundamental properties and interactions of hybrid perovskite semiconductors and functional metallopolymer materials for developing efficient solar energy conversion processes. He has keen interests in photoinduced charge transfer processes, interfacial electron transfer, electrochemical hydrogen generation, and photoredox reactions for photovoltaics and solar fuel production. The investigations between material phenomena rely heavily on concepts and techniques of material and physical engineering, consisting of photophysics, electrochemistry, photoelectrochemistry, scanning photoelectrochemical microscopy imaging, ultrafast transient absorption and time-resolved photoluminescence spectra.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Sam H. Y. Hsu
    City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

    A variety of PbI2/MAPbI3 perovskites were prepared and investigated by a rapid screening technique utilizing a modified scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) in order to determine how excess PbI2 affects its photoelectrochemical (PEC) properties. An optimum ratio of 2.5% PbI2/MAPbI3 was found to enhance photocurrent over pristine MAPbI3 on a spot array electrode under irradiation. With bulk films of various PbI2/MAPbI3 composites prepared by a spin-coating technique of mixed precursors and a one-step annealing process, the 2.5% PbI2/MAPbI3 produced an increases photocurrent density compared to pristine MAPbI3 for 2mM benzoquinone (BQ) reduction at − 0.4 V vs Fc/Fc+. As a result of the relatively high quantum yield of MAPbI3, a time-resolved photoluminescence quenching experiment could be applied to determine electron-hole diffusion coefficients and diffusion lengths of PbI2/MAPbI3 composites, respectively. The diffusion coefficients combined with the exciton lifetime of the pristine 2.5% PbI2/MAPbI3 (τPL = 103.3 ns) give the electron and hole exciton diffusion lengths, ~ 300 nm. Thus, the 2.5% PbI2/MAPbI3 led to an approximately 3.0-fold increase in the diffusion length compared to a previous report of ~ 100 nm for the pristine MAPbI3 perovskite. We then demonstrated that the efficiency of liquid-junction solar cells for 2.5% excess PbI2 of p-MAPbI3 was improved from 6.0% to 7.3%.

    Time:
    12:25 - 12:50

    Lunch-12:50 - 14:00

    Title: Effects of Vertical Clogging Layer on the Surface-Groundwater Interaction in Unconfined Sloping Aquifer

    Chhaya K. Lande
    Symbiosis International, India

    Biography
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    Biography

    Chhaya K. Lande
    Symbiosis International, India

    Chhaya Kiran Lande is a Research scholar of Symbiosis International (Deemed University), Pune, India and working as an Associate professor In mathematics at the RMD Sinhgad school of Engineering, Pune. She has obtained her M.Sc. in Mathematics from North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon, India. Her area of research is surface-groundwater hydrology. Her area of interest is differential equations, Hydrology, Numerical methods, Transforms. She has published various papers in peer reviewed journals. She developed a Mathematical models which has capable of predicting water table fluctuation in confined and unconfined aquifer by considering complex geological system for her Ph.D.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Chhaya K. Lande
    Symbiosis International, India

    This study presents an analytical model to understand the dynamic behaviour of surface-groundwater interaction in a stream-aquifer system in the presence of a clogging layer. The mathematical model consists of an unconfined aquifer of semi-infinite extent resting on a sloping impervious base and interacting with a stream of varying water level. The hydro-interaction is mediated by a thin clogging layer whose hydrologic properties are different from that of the aquifer. The unsteady groundwater flow is approximated by linearized advection-diffusion equation subjected to mixed boundary conditions, including a nonlinear Robin boundary condition. Closed from analytical expressions are developed for water head distribution, flow rate and volumetric exchange of water between stream and aquifer. In few limiting cases, the results reduced to earlier known results. Performance of analytical solution is compared with numerical solution of corresponding nonlinear Boussinesq equation. Sensitivity of the aquifer parameters is analyzed with an illustrative example.

    Time:
    14:00 - 14:25

    Title: Planning for environmental protection in offshore oil drilling and production industry

    Ossama Mohamed Aboul Dahab
    University of Alexandria, Egypt

    Biography
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    Biography

    Ossama Mohamed Aboul Dahab
    University of Alexandria, Egypt

    Ossama Mohamed Taha Aboul Dahab got his Ph. D. in marine chemistry and pollution in1985, joint supervision between Alexandria university, Egypt and Liverpool university, UK. He was graduated from Oceanography Dept., Alexandria University in 1975 and since that time he is still working in the department of oceanography, faculty of science, University of Alexandria till now. He visited as a scientific scholar more than 15 different countries. He attended more than 40 international conferences and meetings about oceanography in the area of marine chemistry and pollution. He published 4 books and more than 40 papers in open literature. He supervised and shared executing of more than 20 projects in the field of pollution prevention and environmental protection and management especially with regard to offshore oil and gas industry.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Ossama Mohamed Aboul Dahab
    University of Alexandria, Egypt

    This work summarizes the types and environmental negative effects of offshore oil drilling and production wastes. These wastes include production chemicals, drilling fluids, production and formation waters, heavy metals, salt, petroleum hydrocarbons, air pollutants, nuclear radiation in addition to the acoustic impacts. Damage to the coastal environment has three potential costs to present and future human welfare. Human health may be harmed. Economic productivity may be reduced. The pleasure or satisfaction obtained from an unspoiled environment, often referred to as its "amenity" value may be lost. The present work also discusses the importance of developing comprehensive environmental protection plans and measures to optimize the use of offshore oil resources. Environmental protection plans for offshore oil drilling and production industry may include environmental audits, waste management plans, waste management actions, contingency plans and employee training. Environmental protection measures which can be considered in offshore oil drilling and production are drilling operations, management requirements, planning and phasing, site visits, environmental preparedness, restoration and abandonment completion.

    Time:
    14:25 - 14:50

    Title: An Evaluation of the Effects of Historical Coal Mining Activities on Water Quality in the Elitheni Colliery, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa

    Lindani Ncube
    University of South Africa, South Africa

    Biography
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    Biography

    Lindani Ncube
    University of South Africa, South Africa

    Lindani Ncube is a geologist who holds a PhD in geology. Her professional background encompasses: Geology; geological field mapping, core logging, coal and sediments sampling, exploration project development and scoping, implementation of logging standards and sampling protocols, implementation of best practice mineral resources management, building of geological block models and utilizing own software, reporting resources, geological feasibility studies, determination of grade profile and the development of product grade control systems, management of all geological functions required to support functional mine. She is a highly motivated friendly individual, who believes in team work, outgoing, charismatic, easily adapt to new environments and changing priorities. Possess excellent communication and interpersonal skills.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Lindani Ncube
    University of South Africa, South Africa

    The study reported on here was conducted to assess the impacts of historic coal mining activities at Elitheni Colliery in South Africa. Five boreholes and five water ponds were sampled during the summer of 2010 and winter of 2011. Physical characteristics (pH, EC, TDS) and hydrochemical characteristics (Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, HCO3-, Cl-, SO42-, F-, Pb and Fe) of the water were determined. To assess the suitability of the water for irrigation purposes, parameters such as total hardness, sodium absorption ratio (SAR), percentage sodium (% Na), residual sodium carbonate (RSC), permeability index (PI) and Mg ratio were calculated. The pH of the water ranged from 6.87 to 8.91, and electrical conductivity (EC) was between 4.5 and 94 mS/m. Total dissolved solids (TDS) ranged from 178 to 470 mg/L; spatial variations in TDS attest to variations in lithological composition, activities and prevailing hydrological regimes. HCO3- and SO42- were the dominant anions, while Na+ was the dominant cation. Na-K-SO4and Na-HCO3 were the dominant hydrochemicalfacies. Fe content was high in borehole water due to the oxidation of pyrite. On the basis of the calculated SAR, % Na, RSC, Mg ratio and salt content, it was concluded that the water can be used for irrigation purposes. The water quality analysis provided no conclusive evidence that historical mining activities have had any significant impact on the acidification of water resources in Elitheni Colliery. However, further studies are required to ascertain the ability of the aquatic environment and surrounding rocks to buffer any acid generated.

    Time:
    14:50 - 15:15

    Title: Placer Minerals Deposits Of South West Coast Of India: Their Sustainable Exploitation And Envirnoment Management

    T.N. Prakash
    National Center for Earth Science Studies, India

    Biography
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    Biography

    T.N. Prakash
    National Center for Earth Science Studies, India

    Dr. Prakash T.N. is a Marine Scientist by profession. He is working at National Centre for Earth Science Studies (NCESS) at Trivandrum. He is heading the Coastal Processes Group of NCESS and has over 30 years' of research experience in the Beach and Coastal Processes including the Management aspects. He has published more than 40 research papers in national and international journals including a book and two field-guide books



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    T.N. Prakash
    National Center for Earth Science Studies, India

    The beaches of SW coast of India are being mined for placer mineral deposits rich in ilmenite, leucoxence, rutile, sillimanite, zircon, monazite, garnet, etc. In the recent years the mining of these minerals have brought considerable attention of the ill effects of commercial mining. The exploitation has given rise to many problems. The industry is often forced to address the problem of coastal erosion on one side and the environmental and socio-economic problems on the other side. All adhoc measures to alleviate the crisis were not able address the issues. A scientific and at the same time, holistic approach is needed for the long term solution, which only can solve the problem and mitigate the damage caused to the coastal ecosystem. The sustainable exploitation is suggested on a well-thought-out plan` to ensure the optimum recovery of the mineral wealth with minimum environmental impacts. The two important aspects to be addressed for a long term strategy for the placer development are (i) How much mineral accumulates on the beaches or near shore` every year and how much of it can be mined without causing the degradation of coast and, (ii) How can the offshore and inland deposits be mined with minimum environmental damages and with least socio-economic problems. In this paper the sustainable mining strategy is suggested through sediment budgeting and Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM) plan approach.

    Time:
    15:15 - 15:40

    Coffee Break- 15:40 - 15:55

    Title: Countermeasure for Overturn of Existing on-the-Ground Breakwater due to Tsunami

    Katsutoshi Ueno
    Tokushima University, Japan

    Biography
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    Biography

    Katsutoshi Ueno
    Tokushima University, Japan

    Katsutoshi Ueno was born in 1964. He worked as a research associate in The Univ. of Utsunomiya from 1991 to 1998. Then he moved to Tokushima University. In 2001, he received Doctorate of engineering from Tokyo Institute of Technology. Currently he works as an Associate Professor of Geotechnical Engineering in Field of Disaster Science and Mitigation, Tokushima University.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Katsutoshi Ueno
    Tokushima University, Japan

    Overturn of breakwater was caused by rise of sea level due to tsunami was occurred at Toni, Tohoku in Japan. A series of geotechnical centrifuge model tests was conducted to develop countermeasure of overturn of existing on-the-ground breakwater due to tsunami. Firstly this accident was reproduced by using geotechnical centrifuge in Tokushima Univ. Then the mechanisms of overturn were discussed and role of lift pressure acting under the bottom of on-the-ground breakwater was pointed out. Countermeasure using sheet pile wall, which will decrease lift pressures, was examined by both centrifuge model tests and numerical analysis. Finally minimum requirement about penetration depth of sheet pile for overturn prevention was proposed based on both experimental and analytical results.

    Time:
    15:55 - 16:20

    Title: Influence of Particle Size Distribution on Heavy Metal Geochemistry of Lagos Harbour, Nigeria

    Awwal Bamanga
    University of Portsmouth, United Kingdom

    Biography
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    Biography

    Awwal Bamanga
    University of Portsmouth, United Kingdom

    Currently, Awwal Bamanga is a Doctoral Candidate at the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences (SEES) University of Portsmouth, United Kingdom, working on marine pollution of harbour systems as a result of shipping, industrial and natural activities. He have more than fourteen years’ experience in the monitoring and evaluation of pollution control and management in coastal marine ecosystems within the maritime industry. He possess a range of skills in monitoring marine pollution through the identification and detection of chemical, biological and physical pollutants, analysing and assessing the concentrations of these contaminants using advanced environmental equipment, and relating the findings to various sources including local environmental changes, shipping and industrial activities.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Awwal Bamanga
    University of Portsmouth, United Kingdom

    The coastal zone of Lagos Harbour, Nigeria, is vulnerable due to the potentially contaminating consequences of human activities. Thisis particularly the case for the basin of Lagos Harbour due to restricted water circulation. The aim of this investigation was to determine the influence of sediment particle size distribution (PSD) on the heavy metalgeochemistry of Lagos Harbour Area. A total of twenty-six sampling sites wereestablished across Lagos Harbour and Lagoon for the determination of the PSD of sediment samplesusing a Malvern Instruments MASTERSIZER 2000 laser diffractometer following the method according to British Standards (BS 1377-2,1990). Heavy metal concentrations were determined using both the 1 M HClextraction method and the aqua-regiamethod. The particle size distributions (clay and silt) showed significant positive correlations (p<0.05) with As,Cr and Cu, based on the 1 M HClextraction method. Significant positive correlations (p<0.05) were also obtained based on theaqua-regiamethod for all the elements. Thestrong correlation between decreasing sediment size and increasing heavy metal concentration is well documented and suggests that adsorption is the main mechanism by which trace metals accumulate on particles, given that small particles have a higher surface area relative to their volume than large particles. It is also generally accepted that trace metals are mainly concentrated in the clay/silt sediment fraction, consisting of particles of grain sizes 63m. The study contributes to knowledge in respect to developing a basis for a more extensive investigation of heavy metals in the sediment of Lagos Harbour area. Due to the links demonstrated between particle size and metal contamination, it is vital that a comprehensive determination of the particle size distribution is conducted in Lagos harbour in order better to understand sediment driven pollution in the harbour and thereby develop tailoredsediment quality guidelines.

    Time:
    16:20 - 16:45

    Title: Integrated Geophysical and Geological Studies to Investigate the Subsurface Structures and Groundwater Quality Around Moghra Lake, Northwestern Desert, Egypt

    Maha Abdelazeem
    National Research Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics NRIAG, Egypt

    Biography
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    Biography

    Maha Abdelazeem
    National Research Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics NRIAG, Egypt

    Maha Abdelazeem received her B.Sc. (1990) and M.Sc. (1993) from Cairo University in Geophysics, potential field interpretation. In 2001, she received her Ph.D. in potential field inversion and interpretation. She has a diploma in laser environmental application from Cairo University. She is now an associate Professor at (NRIAG). She was a visiting scientist for institutes in Germany, Slovakia, Hungary, and Crete. Currently, she is the PI for national development project in the northwestern desert of Egypt financed by the Egyptian academy of science.Her main research interests include mathematical modeling and inversion, programming and algorithm design, and regularizing solutions.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Maha Abdelazeem
    National Research Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics NRIAG, Egypt

    The Egyptian Government has launched a national project to cultivate 1.5 million Acres in different desert areas that will be irrigated mainly from groundwater. About 150 thousand Acres are restricted around Moghra Lake, north Western Desert of Egypt. Geophysical, hydrogeological and stratigraphical studies are integrated to assessment the groundwater quality of the Miocene Moghra aquifer in the studied area.Stratigraphically, the Moghra Lake is cut into the clastic-dominated sediments of the lower Miocene Moghra Formation. Detailed investigations of different surface and subsurface stratigraphic sections of the lower Miocene succession have been carried out to recognize lithology, sedimentary structures, lithofacies and depositional environment of the Moghra aquifer. The transitional depositional environments could be subdivided into tide-dominated estuary, open shelf and tide-dominated delta. The highly vertical and lateral variations in the sedimentary facies of the different environments caused the heterogeneity characters of the Moghra aquifer. Geophysically, a detailed high resolution land magnetic survey has been conducted with station spacing two kilometers in order to calculate the depth to basement which in turn gives the thickness of the sedimentary cover and reveal the controlling structures. The reduced to pole map has been subjected to various filters to detect linear and nonlinear magnetic contacts in the area that may affect the flow of the water aquifer. Depths to such sources are estimated using different techniques for confirmation. The estimated depths range from 600m to 3200m. Moreover, a total of 11 VES stations of AB/2 ranging from 1-500 m to delineate the upper surface of the aquifer. Also, determining the water quality from the resistivity values of VES stations. Furthermore the chemical analyses of 20 water samples were used to investigate groundwater suitability for irrigation purposes on the basis of standard guidelines. According to TDS and TH values water was classified as very hard and saline. pH, PI, SAR, RSC,CR andIWQ categorized the groundwater samples as medium quality for irrigation purposes. Based on the results from the above analysis, an integrated model is presented summarizing the possible future plane for use of groundwater as a source for irrigation and human use.

    Time:
    16:45 - 17:10

    Title: Geoelectrical Exploration For Groundwater In Shales: A Case Study Of Ikwo And Environs, South Eastern Nigeria

    Amobi Ekwe
    Federal University, Nigeria

    Biography
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    Biography

    Amobi Ekwe
    Federal University, Nigeria

    Dr. Amobi Chigozie Ekwe is a Senior Lecturer at the Department of Geology and Geophysics, Federal University Ndufu Alike Ikwo. He obtained a Bachelor of Technology (B.Tech) degree in Geosciences (Geophysics) from the Federal University of Technology, Owerri (Nigeria); MSc. and PhD degrees in Applied Geophysics from the University of Nigeria, Nsukka. He is the Faculty Adviser of FUNAI Student Chapters of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) and the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG). He has published many papers both at local and international journals and his research interest spans through Seismic inversion and Hydrogeophysics.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Amobi Ekwe
    Federal University, Nigeria

    An assessment of the groundwater potential of IKWO and environs was carried out by combining datasets from geographic information system (GIS), geology and geophysics. The area is underlain by the Asu River Group. Geologically, Asu River Group of Albian age comprises of Shales, Limestones and Sandstone lenses of the Abakaliki Formation in the Abakaliki and Ikwo areas. The shales are generally weathered, fissile, thinly laminated and highly fractured and varies between greyish brown to pinkish red in colour. Seventeen (17) vertical electrical sounding (VES) results, using the Schlumberger method were acquired for the study area. A maximum current electrode spacing (AB) of 300 meters was used for data acquisition. Six (6) of the soundings were carried out near existing boreholes for comparative purposes between the geological and geoelectric sections. Curve matching techniques and computer iterative modelling were integrated and used in data processing. The layer parameters thus obtained from the analysis were combined with borehole logs and pumping test data from existing boreholes to estimate aquifer hydraulic parameters. Results show that the depths to the water table range between 22.1-59.4m at Ekpelu and Odeligbo respectively while aquifer thicknesses varies from 17.5m at Onu Nnode market square to 95.3m at Ndufu Inyimagu Ikwo. Hydraulic conductivity varies between 0.004m/day at Community School Ohatekwe and 0.04 m/day at Onyikwa Playground while transmissivity varies between 0.117m2/day at Ndufu Alike 1 and 3.113 m2/day at Ndufu Inyimagu Obeagu Playground.

  • Sessions:
    Rock Deformation and Structural Geology & Mineral Exploration & Volcanology and Tectonic Plates

    Time:
    10:00 - 10:25

    Title: Structural Analysis of the Tall Al Qarn Pressure Ridge, Dead Sea Transform

    Mohammad Atallah
    Yarmouk University, Jordan

    Biography
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    Biography

    Mohammad Atallah
    Yarmouk University, Jordan

    Professor Mohammad Atallah had his BSc and Msc in geology from the University of Jordan in Amman. He Had his PhD in structural geology in 1986 from the Technical University of Munich, Germany. He joined the Yarmouk University in 1987. In 1994-95 he got a Fulbright scholarship in the New Mexico Institute of Technology. He works as visiting professor in some universities in Jordan and spent 4 years as visiting professor in Sultan Qaboos University in Oman. He supervised many Maser and Doctor theses. His research interests are structural geology and active tectonics of the Dead Sea Transform.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Mohammad Atallah
    Yarmouk University, Jordan

    Tall Al Qarn pressure ridge is one of the morphotectonic features formed along the active Dead Sea Transform in the Jordan Valley. The Dead Sea Transform extends from the Gulf of Aqaba to southern Turkey. In Jordan it consists of three morphotectonic segments; Wadi Araba, the Dead Sea basin, and the Jordan Valley. The Jordan Valley fault shows many pressure ridges and sag ponds. This study includes a detailed field investigation to describe the structural elements of the pressure ridge and to figure out the sequence of events affecting the ridge. The outcropping rocks in the study area are Waqqas Formation (Miocene), Ghor al Katar Formation (Early Pleistocene) and Lisan Formation (Late Pleistocene). The ridge was formed due to the right bending (stepping) of the Jordan Valley left lateral strike slip fault. The main structures are: The steeply dipping Waqqas conglomerate. The positive flower structures indicating compressional stresses. Normal, reveres and strike slip faults are also observed crossing the different beds. The Ghor Al Katar beds were tilted and overlain by the horizontal Lisan beds forming a prominent angular unconformity. The Lisan beds in turn are also tilted and disturbed along the Wadi Al Qarn fault. The horizontal Lisan beds are disturbed by seismites indicating seismic activity. The internal structure of the Tall Al Qarn coincides to some extends with the sandbox experimental model. There are many structural events associated with the formation of the pressure ridge; the tilting of the Ghor Al Katar beds, followed by the horizontal deposition of the Lisan Lake beds forming an angular unconformity. The horizontal Lisan beds were disturbed by seismites. Also the Lisan beds were tilted along the active Wadi Al Qarn fault. Historical and instrumental earthquakes indicate the recent seismic activity of the area.

    Time:
    10:25 - 10:50

    Coffee Break- 10:50 - 11:05

    Title: Exploration and Mining of Arkhangelsk Diamond Deposits, NW Russia

    Viktor Garanin
    A.E. Fersman Mineralogical Museum of Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia

    Biography
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    Biography

    Viktor Garanin
    A.E. Fersman Mineralogical Museum of Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia

    Viktor Garanin graduated from Geological Faculty of M.V. Lomonosov State University. Ph. D., Dr., Prof. in Geology. Academician of Russian Academy of Natural Sciences. Since 1975 Chief of Diamond Deposit Laboratory in M.V. Lomonosov State University. Scientific Director of A.E. Fersman Mineralogical Museum of Russian Academy of Sciences. Scientific and research interests are geology, mineralogy and geochemistry mineral deposits (diamonds, gold, base metals), historical geology, analytical works, education, consulting and arts. Author of more than 400 publications including 15 monographs. One of the leaders of World diamond geology.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Viktor Garanin
    A.E. Fersman Mineralogical Museum of Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia

    Discovering the first diamond deposit named after M.V. Lomonosov in Arkhangelsk region in early 1980s, and afterwards the V. Grib deposit in the same region in 1996 allowed viewing the area as a new industrial source of diamonds dubbed Arkhangelsk Diamondiferous Region, Karelian-Kolsky Diamondiferous Province, NW Russia. It is clear now that the industrial potential of the ADP is far from being assessed to the full extent. The area yet has two deposits, while Yakutia can boast of more than 25, so detailed survey of the properties of diamond as such, the paramount indicator of predicting and prospecting for new fields, is a focus of prospecting and exploration in the European part of Russia. M.V. Lomonosov deposit discovered in 1981 lies in the west of the Zolotitsa field and embraces six commercial diamondiferous kimberlite pipes: Lomonosov, Pomorskaya, Pionerskaya, Karpinskogo-1, Karpinskogo- 2, Arkhangelskaya (~360 Ma age). All deposit pipes have been medium diamondiferous to some extent (0.5 – 1.0 ct/t), although in some pipe vents the content could reach 1.0-3.0 cts/t. The total resources of deposit (for all six pipes) are more than 200 mln carats. Commercial mining started in 2005. V. Grib pipe (~355 Ma age) deposit is located within the Chernoozerskoe field with the average grade 0.5-1.5 cts/t and annual production approximately 3.5 mln carats. It is one of the biggest diamond deposits with total resources 98 mln carats. Mining stage started in 2013.

    Time:
    11:05 - 11:30

    Title: Russian Diamond Deposits Capability

    Viktor Garanin
    A.E. Fersman Mineralogical Museum of Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia

    Biography
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    Biography

    Viktor Garanin
    A.E. Fersman Mineralogical Museum of Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia

    Viktor Garanin graduated from Geological Faculty of M.V. Lomonosov State University. Ph. D., Dr., Prof. in Geology. Academician of Russian Academy of Natural Sciences. Since 1975 Chief of Diamond Deposit Laboratory in M.V. Lomonosov State University. Scientific Director of A.E. Fersman Mineralogical Museum of Russian Academy of Sciences. Scientific and research interests are geology, mineralogy and geochemistry mineral deposits (diamonds, gold, base metals), historical geology, analytical works, education, consulting and arts. Author of more than 400 publications including 15 monographs. One of the leaders of World diamond geology.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Viktor Garanin
    A.E. Fersman Mineralogical Museum of Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia

    Russia has the world's largest mineral resource base of diamonds and remains a world leader in the of diamonds production. Total reserves of diamonds are over exceed 1.2 billion carats and resources more than 3.5 bln carats. There are two of the largest diamondiferous provinces in Russia: Yakutian (Sakha-Yakutian Republic, Eastern Russia) and Karelian-Kolsky (Arkhangelsk Region, NW Russia). 11 primary (kimberlite pipes) deposits are located in Sakha Yakutia Republic and 2 in the Arkhangelsk region. The diamonds size and weight of these deposits is varying – from microns to large crystals over 25 carats, and even more. The largest diamond in Russia was recovered from Yubileynaya pipe and has weight 888 carat. The morphology of diamond is also different – octahedrons, dodecahedrons, cubes, polycrystalline aggregates, boards. Diamonds from kimberlite pipes and bodies of the provinces have both similarities and differ rather significantly on a number of specific features. There are new aggregate data on morphological, structural characteristics and physical properties of diamonds from the Karelian-Kolsky and Yakutian diamond provinces, obtained by the authors on the basis of the results of original research, complemented with information from other sources. Complex section of the diamondiferous mantle, the volume of mantle material sampled by kimberlite melts, the duration of kimberlite column passage to the surface lead to the formation of kimberlite pipes with different diamond potential, and it is necessary to take this into account when planning exploration and mining.

    Time:
    11:30 - 11:55

    Title: Multi-attribute Ore Selection

    Jim Everett
    University of Western Australia, Australia

    Biography
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    Biography

    Jim Everett
    University of Western Australia, Australia

    Jim Everett gained his BA in Natural Sciences and PhD in Geophysics from Cambridge University, and his MSc during a Harkness Fellowship at MIT. Following a two-year post doctoral at the Australian National University he worked eight years in the petroleum and mining industries. He completed a BCom and an MCom part-time at the University of Western Australia, where he subsequently taught and researched in the Business School for 30 years. Now retired from UWA as an Emeritus Professor, he continues to research and publish.



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    Abstract

    Jim Everett
    University of Western Australia, Australia

    Many minerals are mined for a valuable component (such as iron) but contain a number of contaminants (such as silica, alumina and phosphorus) that tend to lower the value of the product. The optimum extraction of ore from a mine depends not only on the available mineable material that it contains but also on the market conditions. This paper considers the process of pit definition, for an open-pit mine, with the pit boundary identified iteratively by distinguishing ore from waste. It is shown that, except in the vicinity of the pit boundary, ore can be identified as material that has marginal value exceeding the cost of shipping and processing, since the mining cost is incurred whether it be waste or ore, and discount issues are not relevant because the marginal costs and benefits are contemporaneous. In addition to issues of ore selection, this paper considers ore sequencing, the order in which ore blocks are extracted and processed. Especially when the mined product provides input to subsequent processing, it is important that the product maintains a consistent composition not only in the mineral of value (such as iron) but also in the contaminants (such as silica, alumina and phosphorus). Methods for the sequencing of blocks so as to maintain a consistent composition are discussed. These methods apply a multi-component cost/benefit function, using stress values based on targets and tolerances, giving smoother control than a constraint based system.

    Time:
    11:55 - 12:20

    Title: High Resolution Cathodoluminescence Spectroscopy of Carbonate Cementation in Khurmala Formation ( Paleocene- L. Eocene) from Iraqi Kurdistan Region , Northern Iraq

    Muhamed Omer
    Salahaddin University-Erbil, Iraq

    Biography
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    Biography

    Muhamed Omer
    Salahaddin University-Erbil, Iraq

    Muhamed Fakhri Omer is an Assistant Professor at the Salahaddin University, Iraq since 2017. He did his M.Sc. in 2000 and Ph.D. in 2012 from Baghdad University, Iraq. He worked as a Lecturer at the department of geology, Salahaddin University in Erbil, Iraq in 2004. He done his Postdoctoral scholarships for one year at Warsaw University –Poland 2016. He Participated in many local and international conferences with oral presentations and workshop activities. He Published many papers in the Journal of African Earth Science in 2014 and 2015 and a paper in the Arabian Journal of Geosciences in 2016. He is awarded with Certificate of Reviewing on August 2016 from Journal of African Earth Sciences (ELSEVIER).



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Muhamed Omer
    Salahaddin University-Erbil, Iraq

    A combination of high resolution cathodoluminsecnce-spectroscopy (HRS-CL) with spatial electron microprobe analysis and optical microscopy is used to determine paragenesis and history of cementation in the limestones and dolostones of Khurmala- Formation which is exposed in many parts of northern Iraq. The studied formation was subjected into different diagenetic processes such as micritization, compaction, dissolution, neomorphism, pyritization and cementation that occurred during marine to shallow burial stages and culminated during intermediate to deep burial late stages. Five dolomite-rock textures are recognized and classified according to crystal size distribution and crystal-boundary shape. Dolomitization is closely associated with the development of secondary porosity that pre-and postdates dissolution and corrosion; meanwhile such porosity was not noticed in the associated limestones. Microprobe analysis revealed three types of cement, calcite, dolomite and ankerite which range in their luminescence from dull to bright. Cathodoluminescence study indicated four main texture generations. These are (1) unzoned microdolomite of planar and subhedral shape, with syntaxial rim cement of echinoderm that show dull to red luminescence, (2) equant calcite cements filling interparticle pores which shows dull luminescence and weak zonal growth, (3.1) homogenous intrinsic blue stoichometric calcite with dull luminescence and without activators, (3.2) coarse blocky calcite cement with strong oscillatory zoning and bright orange luminescence which postdates other calcite cements, (4) ankerite cement with red to orange, non- luminescence growth zonation which is the last formed cement.

    Time:
    12:20 - 12:45

    Lunch-12:45 - 14:00

    Title: Tectonic Stages Theory(TSTh), Plates Reconstruction and Alpine Tectonics

    Mohammed M.Y. Alshakir
    Senior Chief Geologist, Iraq

    Biography
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    Biography

    Mohammed M.Y. Alshakir
    Senior Chief Geologist, Iraq

    Mohammed M.Y. Alshakir was born on April 23, 1947. He completed his B.Sc. General Geology in 1970 at Mosul university, Iraq. He is retired as a senior chief geologist at 2010. He has 39 years of experience in Iraqi Nation Oil companies. He discovered the Tectonic Stages Theory at 1992, first application Tectonic of Iraq in 1993.



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    Abstract

    Mohammed M.Y. Alshakir
    Senior Chief Geologist, Iraq

    Traditional Tectonic studies generally create maps includes effects of several tectonics titled, Tectonic Elements Map .This study used stratigraphy and basins analysis, to detect tectonics stages, in order to differentiate and to separate each tectonic stage effect, and to create map for each tectonic stage. So on using this method of work new theory discovered given the title "The Tectonic Stages Theory (TSTh)" - Alshakir 1992. A complete study covered all the stratigraphic sections in iraq as application of the TSTh. But this paper represents example only of TSTh and restricted to , Alpine tectonics, the previously called Alpine orogenies early, middle and late as convergent, affected in NW direction, collision of the Arabian plate with the Iranian- Eurasian plate, Cretaceous – recent, this is as in previous literatures believes. According to the TSTh principles, the present study proved that: - The Alpine Tectonics, their effect on the part of the Arabian plate in iraq, Cretaceous to recent, in fact are many stages grouped in several main tectonic stages, more than three, and acted in different directions . - The only compressional tectonic one was that acted from Pliocene – Pleistocene, which represents the collision of the African – Arabian Plates with the Iranian – Eurasian Plates, resulted in building of zagrose, alpine folds series. While all the other tectonics are tensional and divergent including the recent, present, affecting one. - Tectonics Stages detections, new tectonics discovery not mentioned globally, new ideas of Plates determination and reconstruction, ignore the old idea of Plates rotation or tilts with time.

    Sessions:
    Remote Sensing and GIS & Engineering Geology and Geomechanics & Forensic Geology & Volcanology and Tectonic Plates

    Time:
    14:00 - 14:25

    Title: Global Terrestrial Observations – Coming of Age

    Barbara Ryan
    The Group on Earth Observations (GEO), Switzerland

    Biography
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    Biography

    Barbara Ryan
    The Group on Earth Observations (GEO), Switzerland

    Barbara J. Ryan is Director of the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) in Geneva, Switzerland. She leads the Secretariat in coordinating the activities of 105 Member States and 118 Participating Organizations that are integrating Earth observations globally. Ryan holds a Bachelor´s in Geology from the State University of New York at Cortland, a Master´s in Geography from the University of Denver, and a Master´s in Civil Engineering from Stanford. She was awarded an honorary doctorate of science from the State University of New York at Cortland, was recently named an Honorary Fellow of the American Geographical Society, was one of 10 global Leaders to be named to the Geospatial World Forum’s Hall of Fame (2017).



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Barbara Ryan
    The Group on Earth Observations (GEO), Switzerland

    Enabled by broad, open data policies and practices for the U.S. Landsat satellite series, and the European suite of Sentinel satellites in the Copernicus Program, tremendous advancements have been made in technologies and platforms for global terrestrial observations. Included among these advancements is the work that Australia has done with Data Cube technologies at their National Computing Center (http://nci.org.au/services/virtual-laboratories/australian-geoscience-data-cube/), the Joint Research Center’s (JRC) work on the Global Surface Water Explorer (https://global-surface-water.appspot.com) using Google Earth’s Engine 60,000+ computers worldwide, the Global Human Settlement Layer (http://ghslsys.jrc.ec.europa.eu/), and the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) work on Land Change Monitoring, Assessment, and Projection (LCMAP) (https://eros.usgs.gov/science/lcmap) at their Sioux Falls, South Dakota Earth Resources Observation and Science Center. Each of these technological advancements is permitting analysis of continental and global landscape change that was not possible, heretofore. In fact, these emerging technologies, with international collaboration, can now bring to global terrestrial observations and analysis the same kind of advancements experienced in global mid- to long-range weather forecasting over the last 50 years. While data feeding these global weather forecasting models is derived from all national weather services or bureaus, there are very few truly global modeling centers. It is this fact that provides an analog upon which several (like those mentioned above) global centers for terrestrial observations could emerge. Data derived from national, regional and international mapping efforts of both surficial and bedrock geology, as well as their derivative products, should not be overlooked as key components of global terrestrial monitoring.

    Time:
    14:25 - 14:50

    Title: 360° hyperspectral drill core mineral detection

    Friederike Koerting
    Helmholtz Center Potsdam, Germany

    Biography
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    Biography

    Friederike Koerting
    Helmholtz Center Potsdam, Germany

    Friederike Koerting finished her Master’s Degree in Geology in 2016. She started working with Hyperspectral Imaging Remote Sensing in 2012, since then she has been part of a work group concentrating on the intersection of Geology and Remote Sensing in the near field and in the laboratory for samples and drill cores. Her work concentrates on the applicabilty of imaging sensors for mineralogical analyses. In her on-going PhD work, she investigates the potential of hyperspectral approaches for ore grade vectorization in open pit mining.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Friederike Koerting
    Helmholtz Center Potsdam, Germany

    An ever growing depository of drill cores from different projects in the scientific and industrial community are calling for a time-efficient qualitative mineral analysis which also allows for a high turn-over rate. In the course of the Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides Project (COSC), a 2.5 km drill core was conducted, crossing the Seve Nappe in Sweden. In order to investigate mountain building processes, parts of that core were analysed by the hyperspectral imaging spectrometer HySpex, a sensor system combining the range of the VNIR and SWIR in two instruments. Five core samples of depths ranging from 1682 m to 2469 m were analysed. In order to verify the mineral analyses for the 360° measurement of a core surface, laser induced breakdown spectrometer (LIBS) measurements of a core were compared directly and pixel-wise to the HySpex measurements. The hyperspectral imagery allowed for a resolution of 0.22 mm/ pixel which resembles the resolution of the LIBS measurements. An un-split core sample from 1682 m was used to develop an approach of a hyperspectral measurement of the un-rolled, complete 360° core surface. A step-wise rotation was followed by a mosaicking that lead to the rectification of the core surface. The determination of precise key points allowed for the stitching of several core images, even with taking into account the homogenous, very fine-grained characteristics of the rock. The measurements of the whole core surface with overlapping surface frames amounted to 22 h/ m of core and resulted in a hyperspectral mosaic of the core mantle surface. Relative to the approximately 550 h needed to measure 1 m of core with the LIBS, the hyperspectral method seems fair and feasible. The succeeding mineral mapping with EnGeoMap proved to be very precise when detecting the abundance of single minerals, when mapping multiple minerals, a bias towards a few minerals was found. This bias due to mineral-dependent fit value tresholds of the algorithm has to be investigated further in the future. When applying EnGeoMap, it proves a valuable tool to evaluate mineral content and their spatial distribution over the course of a drill core, especially to highlight changes in mineral assemblages. This can be seen as the beginning of the development of a stand-alone hyperspectral drill core scanner.

    Time:
    14:50 - 15:15

    Title: Land Cover Classification of Fergana Valley Using NDVI Method

    Zheenbek Kulenbekov
    American University of Central Asia, Kyrgyzstan

    Biography
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    Biography

    Zheenbek Kulenbekov
    American University of Central Asia, Kyrgyzstan

    Dr. Kulenbekov received his PhD from the Technical University of Freiberg Mining Academy, Germany in 2013. Currently, he is working as a Chair of Environmental Management and Sustainable Development (EMSD) and Applied Geology programs at the American University of Central Asia (AUCA), since August 2014. He is one of the recipients of a research award from PEER, administered by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in 2016. He is a member of the Intergovernmental science-policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) since 2016. He is a member of AUCA Expert Council of USAID Building Future Project since January, 2017.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Zheenbek Kulenbekov
    American University of Central Asia, Kyrgyzstan

    This paper describes methodology and results of NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index). The NDVI helps to generate accurate land cover maps in fully automatic manner from Landsat8 remote sensed data throughout USGS website. A preliminary study aimed at recognizing the healthy and stressed vegetation in Ferghana Valley over three years in 2014, 2015 and 2016. Territory and cities of Ferghana Valley have been selected as study areas (Andijan, Fergana, Margilan, Namangan, Kokand, Shahimardan); they are covering different agricultural regions and greenery types, from evergreen to others. According to the results, in 2016 the vegetation indices are shown higher value than in 2014 and 2015, there may be different reasons for this, particularly relatively denser vegetation, lack of water, soil properties or/and likely different weather conditions due to climate change. Hence, the NDVI tool is credible method for researching an assessment of crop density and health.

    Time:
    15:15 - 15:40

    Coffee Break- 15:40 - 15:55

    Title: Immersive Environments in Oil and Gas Exploration

    Rifaat M. Abdalla
    Sultan Qaboos University, Oman

    Biography
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    Biography

    Rifaat M. Abdalla
    Sultan Qaboos University, Oman

    Dr. Rifaat Abdalla is Associate Professor in the Department of Earth Sciences, College of Science, Sultan Qaboos University. He is specialized in GeoInformatics. Dr. Rifaat Abdalla is a Certified GIS Professional (GISP) and Professional Geoscientist (P.Geo.) from Ontario, Canada. Dr. Abdalla worked in Oil Industry in Qatar and in UK and was teaching at York University and Ryerson University in Canada. His research interests include Hydrography and Marine Applications for GIS; Modeling and Simulation; and Disaster Management and Emergency Response Mapping. He is a recipient of several prestigious international awards, including the ASPRS, ESRI Best Scientific Paper



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Rifaat M. Abdalla
    Sultan Qaboos University, Oman

    The application of immersive environments in oil and gas exploration is broad and it is expanding every day. Recent developments in Virtual Reality systems (VR) and Augmented Reality systems (AR) and Mixed Reality (MR) supported by the advances in geospatial databases and distributed systems has provided a benefit to the user community. Many sectors including oil and gas began to use these technologies. As a result, considerable cost saving in terms of time and effort was unmistakable. The realistic virtual views of complex and sophisticated operations whether it be simple modeling and simulation linked to three dimensional visualization, or planning and monitoring for complex directional drilling helped with achieving more operational safety. This talk will highlight the history of spatial modeling and simulation, the capabilities, functionalities and processes involved in design and implementation of immersive environments. The talk will provide a brief account of future trends in this technology.

    Time:
    15:55 - 16:20

    Title: Application of Emission Spectroscopy in Mapping Epithermal Gold Deposits

    Graham Ferrier
    University of Hull, United Kingdom

    Biography
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    Biography

    Graham Ferrier
    University of Hull, United Kingdom

    Dr Ferrier background is in physics and geology with a focus on the utility of hyperspectral remote sensing in the geological mapping and environmental monitoring. Dr Ferrier’s current research focus is in the development of new methodologies for ground, UAV and airborne-based emission spectroscopy particularly focused on resource evaluation



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Graham Ferrier
    University of Hull, United Kingdom

    The emission spectra from a rock are extremely sensitive to variations in the fabric and bulk chemistry of the rock and the composition of the constituent mineral species particularly feldspars, garnets, pyroxenes, olivines, and SiO2 minerals. For igneous geologists potential applications of thermal infrared spectroscopy include detection of temporal and spatial thermal patterns; mapping recently-erupted volcanic and volcanic-related deposits; discriminating volcanic rock surfaces in terms of textural differences; distinguishing the relative age of volcanic surfaces and thermal inertia mapping. Recent developments in imaging thermal infrared spectroscopy instruments (both ground and airborne based) provide a potential step-change in the range and quality of mineralogical, lithological and morphological remote sensing datasets that can be retrieved over volcanic terrains. The aim of this project is to investigate the potential of thermal infrared spectroscopy in resolving a range of the key mineralogical and lithological information required by geologists studying volcanic terrains. The Island of Milos, Greece. Milos, a dormant volcano in the Southern Aegean Volcanic Arc, is being used as a study area because: 1: it has an extensive range of fresh and hydrothermally volcanic rocks ; 2. : it has high and low enthalpy geothermal energy resources; 3: there are a number of fossilised, mineralised hydrothermal systems; 4: the weather is stable with low humidity and high temperatures; and 5: there is a lack of vegetation and excellent rock exposure. Airborne hyperspectral datasets covering the VNIR, SWIR and TIR have been acquired over MILOS and have been analysed to produce mineralogical and lithological maps. Supporting field spectral surveys using PIMA and ASD spectroradiometers and MIDAC and Exoscan FTIRs were carried out. A representative range of field samples were analysed in the Laboratory to produce a library of emission and DHR measurements. These samples were then analysed for their bulk chemistry and mineralogy using quantitative XRD and supporting petrological analyses. The results of this study show the potential of an integrated field and airborne thermal waverange remote sensing study to provide invaluable additional geological understanding to the distribution and genesis of epithermal and hydrothermal mineral deposits.

    Time:
    16:20 - 16:45

    Title: The Strategic Application of Forensic Detection Canines to Detect Clandestine Graves Within Complex Geologic Contexts

    Martin Grime
    Staffordshire University, United Kingdom

    Biography
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    Biography

    Martin Grime
    Staffordshire University, United Kingdom

    Martin Grime is a Subject Matter Expert in relation to the use of detection canines within Law Enforcement investigation of homicide. His experience includes support to the UK National Police Improvement Agency, European Defense Agency, Irish Prison Service, US Department of Justice FBI, Australian Federal Police, States of Jersey Police, Police Scotland, England and Wales. Martin is a member of; International Union of Geological Sciences, Geosciences for Environmental Management, GIN, U.K Home Office - Centre for Applied Science and Technology - Search Technologies Academic Research Team. He is a Research Fellow at Staffordshire University, School of Law, Policing and Forensics.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Martin Grime
    Staffordshire University, United Kingdom

    Properly trained, proficient, and validated human decomposition specific detection canines may be deployed within a geological strategic mission plan to locate buried human remains within diverse geological contexts. Their training is inclusive of double blind laboratory type screening of soil and groundwater samples. When samples are collected in accordance within a strategy formulated from geological survey and profiling, positive canine responses may provide intelligence to identify specific geological contexts, such as hydroplanes, for further investigation. This ability provides an opportunity for geologists, and search managers, to task the strategic planning of soil and groundwater recovery and canine sampling on a large scale, in quick time, in support of fast moving criminal investigations and natural disaster recovery missions.

  • Sessions:
    Palaeontology and Palaeo-Anthropology & Soil Science & Geochemistry and Economic Potential of Rocks & Surface and Borehole Geophysics & Petroleum Geology and Geothermal Energy & Issues in Global Warming and Climate Change

    Time:
    09:00 - 09:25

    Title: The fossil records of Brachyura, Balanidae (Crustaceans) and fish (Osteichthyes + Chondrichthyes) from the Under Pliocene Kueichoulin Formation Taoyuan Daxi of the northwest region of Taiwan

    Shih-Wei Lee
    National Museum of Marine Science and Technology, Taiwan

    Biography
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    Biography

    Shih-Wei Lee
    National Museum of Marine Science and Technology, Taiwan

    Shih-Wei Lee has received a bachelor’s in biology at Tunghai University in Taichung, Taiwan; a master’s in Zoology at the University of Göttingen, Germany; and a Ph.D. in Geology and Paleontology at the University of Tübingen, Germany. He worked as a researcher in the State Museum of Natural History in Stuttgart, Germany. Research interests include: Arthropoda (insects and crustacea) biology, evolutionary paleontology and phylogenetic systematics. Currently working at the Research and Collection Division at the National Museum of Marine Science and Technology and teaching at the National Taiwan Ocean University. Working also in popular science theme.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Shih-Wei Lee
    National Museum of Marine Science and Technology, Taiwan

    Crustacean fauna of Taiwan is abundant, composed of taxa of lobsters, crayfishes, shrimps, krill, woodlice as well as more than500 species crabs and 120 species of barnacles. However, fossil records are limited to mainly crab, there are huge number of fossil materials to be available and mostly well preserved. Comparable, barnacle fossils are rare. On the other side of vertebrate, fossil records fish’s are extremely rare in Taiwan. To this day, only the teeth of small sharks, fossil Fish otoliths, fish scales, spine and whole small fish’s bodies have been identified—mostly from the Under Pliocene Kueichoulin Formation Taoyuan Daxi and Chia-Yi Liuchungchi Formation of Taiwan. Daxi Fossil Lagerstätte shows clearly a marine sediment environment, abundant also in Mollusca, Echinoidea especially Sea urchins. The fossil record of whale and the symbiosis are reports, and is to days not its habitat. A collection from the past 30 years archived in the National Museum of Marine Science and Technology  (NMMST), Academia Sinica, and Chia-Yi Municipal Museum. This precious collection has not been classified scientifically, and a preliminary assessment indicated that the specimens fall under four to six species. The research was conducted on the Under Pliocene Kueichoulin Formation of Taoyuan Daxi, Chia-Yi Liuchungchi Formation and Keelung Nun-Nun Formation of Taiwan. The aim of this brief report is to present research on the barnacle fossil, including its basic morphology, taxonomy, geological strata and age, distribution, etc., and to facilitate follow-up in-depth study. The report also initiates discussions about the regional, ecological and environmental changes. Key words: fossil record, Balanidae, Whale, Symbiosis, geological time

    Time:
    09:25 - 09:50

    Title: An Interdisciplinary Insight in to Biostratigraphy and Palaeoecology around the Albian–Cenomanian Boundary in the Levant: A Case Study in the Mount Carmel Region

    Maria Ovechkina
    Geological Survey of Israel, Israel

    Biography
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    Biography

    Maria Ovechkina
    Geological Survey of Israel, Israel

    Dr Maria Ovechkina is a micropaleontologist specializing in the calcareous nannoplankton. She has a rich experience working with the Cretaceous and Cainozoic nannofossils and provided identifications, biozonation and palaeoreconstructions based on the quantitative analysis of nannofossils for numerous collaborative projects spanning from the Western Siberia to South Africa, and from the Cretaceous to Holocene



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Maria Ovechkina
    Geological Survey of Israel, Israel

    Biostratigraphic analysis was based on the study of the calcareous nannoplankton and planktic foraminifera from a 225-m deep borehole CT8, Mount Carmel Region, NW Israel, which penetrates the Yagur, Isfiye, Tavasim Tuff and Arqan formations. The entire succession belongs to (sub)zonesNC9b (Upper Albian), NC9b&UC0a–b (Upper Albian), UC0a–b (Upper Albian), UC0c (Upper Albian – Lower Cenomanian), UC1 (Lower Cenomanian), UC2 (Lower Cenomanian), and UC3 (Middle – Upper Cenomanian). The first occurrence (FO) of Thalmanninella globotruncanoides, preceded by the FO of Th. brotzeni and followed by the FO of Corollithion kennedyi, places the Albian–Cenomanian boundary in the lower part of the Arqan Fm, about 52 m above the top Tavasim Tuff. The 98.2 Ma age of Tavasim Tuff at the bottom third of Arqan Fm and 96.7 Ma age of Raqefet Basalt at the center of Arqan Fm reliably constrain the absolute age of the Albian–Cenomanian boundary in the region. The whole Late Albian/Cenomanian succession in NW Israel was deposited under temperate (23–21°C) to quite warm (up to 32°C), open marine, unstable, oligotrophic conditions with poor nutrient supply. Several palaeoecological phases are recognized on the basis of the quantitative analysis of the calcareous nannoplankton, the Productivity Index and δ18O values, with warming/cooling events of various scale and fluctuations of eutrophication/oligotrophication during each phase. The project is supported by the Ministry of National Infrastructures, Israel.

    Time:
    09:50 - 10:15

    Coffee Break- 10:15 - 10:30

    Title: Whether the Lanping Basin is part of Gondwanaland or Cathaysia, SW China?

    Lifei Yang
    China University of Geosciences, China

    Biography
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    Biography

    Lifei Yang
    China University of Geosciences, China

    Lifei Yang,a doctor student at the China University of Geosciences in Beijing (China) at present, graduated with a B.Sc. (2014) from Yunnan University. His research fields include tectonic evolution, metallogenesis and sedimentology of the Sanjiang Tethys, SW China. From now, he has published 6 SCI research papers.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Lifei Yang
    China University of Geosciences, China

    The basin evolution was recorded in sedimentary rocks. And basin affiliation can be solvedby the ages distribution and Hf isotope from detrital zircons. TheLanping Basin is located in the Sanjiang-Tethys Orogen, west of the Yangtze Block, and weather it is part of the Cathaysia or Gondwanaland has been a hot question discussed.This manuscript documents the affiliation of Lanping Basin using detrital zircon age distributions, Hf isotopic geochemistry of detrital zircons and the magmatic rock from the Lanping Basin and surrounding area. By comparing the detrital zircon age distributions and magmatic rocks(Fig. 1), the detrital zircon in the basin have the similar ages with the Early Neoproterozoic magmatic rocks in the western Yangtze Block and the Triassic magmatic rocks from middle part of Lanping Basin and the area where Yangtze Block is in contact with the Sanjiang-Tethyan Orogen, which might be the provenance for sedimentary units.The combination of the zircon profiles, ages distribution and Hf isotope from detrital zircons in Lanping Basin, Tengchong-Baoshan Terrane and western Yangtze Block(Fig. 1), it shows that the basin has a Cathaysian–affinity, rather than one involving Gondwanaland during tectonic evolution.

    Time:
    10:30 - 10:55

    Title: The Upper Ordovician sequence in the Ghadamis basin, Libya, Seismic Expressions and Depositional Model

    Abdelgader Kernaf
    New Oil Generation, Czech Republic

    Biography
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    Biography

    Abdelgader Kernaf
    New Oil Generation, Czech Republic

    Abdelgader Krnaf received his Bsc in Geology from Garyounis University, Libya in 2007. He worked for pioneer Service and Owner Companies such as Schlumberger, Baker Hughes, Total & BP. He also worked as Geoscience visiting lecturer at Benghazi University & University of Kurdistan, Hawler. He was awarded an Msc in Petroleum Geoscience at Royal Holloway, University of London in 2009. In 2015 was appointed by EAGE and AAPG to Chair sessions at Geoscience workshops and was a member of the third Conference on Iraq technical committee in UAE. Now is Director at NEW OIL GENERATION, Libya, Oman and Czech Republic.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Abdelgader Kernaf
    New Oil Generation, Czech Republic

    The Ghadamis basin is a large intracratonic sag basin which straddles the boundaries between Libya, Algeria and Tunisia. The Area of study is focused on the BP Blocks in Western Libya. An Upper Ordovician glaciogenic sequence is present throughout the study area with coarser sediment in the south, which then gradually fine northwards. This facies behavior is interpreted from the well correlations and is mainly attributed to the change in the glacially influenced depositional environments of the area. Discrete Channelized features trending N-S to NNW-SSE were mapped on 2-D and 3-D seismic data. They are interpreted as glacial palaeovalleys in the south, which developed under an ice sheet in a glacio-continental environment, while in the north they are interpreted as proglacial channels deposited in front of an ice sheet in a glacio-marine environment. These interpretations are based on a comparison with surface outcrop features with similar scales. Seismic characters of the upper Ordovician show dipping reflector geometries and cross cutting relationships with dim and bright amplitudes. Multiple phases of sedimentary cut and fill within these channels and palaeovalleys are observed on both data bases. These are also seen on the surface outcrop analogous of the Gargaf Arch and are interpreted to occur during multiple cycles of ice sheet advance and retreat. Glacial palaeovalleys are the main means of sediment transportation during Late Ordovician and they show a northerly trend with their mouths opened to the north.

    Time:
    10:55 - 11:20

    Title: Aerated Static Pile (ASP)-Enhanced Bioaugmentation of Oil Sludge Contaminated Soil Using LIBeM Consortium

    Piakong Mohd. Tuah
    Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Malaysia

    Biography
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    Biography

    Piakong Mohd. Tuah
    Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Malaysia

    Dr. Piakong Mohd. Tuah completed her PhD at UTM, Skudai Malaysia in Bioremediation. He completed his MSc. Environmental Biotechnology in Bristol, England in 1997. Now he is working as a Associate Professor at Faculty of Science & Natural Resources, Universiti Malaysia Sabah (UMS) Sabah, Malaysia. From 1981- Jan 1998 he worked as Environmental Health Officer, Ministry of Health Malaysia stationed at Health Office, Kota Belud, Kota Kinabalu, Semporna and Tawau, Sabah assigned to various units: Food Quality Control, Communicable Disease Control, Rural Environmental Sanitation Programme, General Health (includes International Health). Other responsibilities were to perform duties as a Prosecuting Officer under the Food Act 1983 and other respective public health laws in Malaysia. Recipient of the TCP (Technical Co-operation Programme) Scholarship 1993, British Government, U.K. Passed Malaysia Government Laws Examination in 1989.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Piakong Mohd. Tuah
    Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Malaysia

    This paper focused on efficiency of selective locally isolated beneficial microorganisms (LIBeM) consortium inbioaugmentation of oil sludge contaminated soil in a laboratory scale. Five different selective microbial consortiums LIBeM were obtained from Environmental Microbiology Laboratory, Universiti Malaysia Sabah. The arrangement of aerated static pile (ASP)-bioreactor made up of acrylic materials dimension (60cmx40cmx20cm) was developed with three silicone tubing’s connected to air pump (Model RESUN lp100 Low Noise Air Pump) act as continuous aeration to the soil. Six different sets treatment containing 10 kg of soil mixed with 20% (v/v) oil sludge were denoted as Consortium 1(P. aeruginosaBAS-Cr1+ S. paucimobilis ReTOS-Cr1+ S. maltophilia RAS-Cr1), Consortium 2 (C. tropicalis RETL-Cr1+ C. violaceumMAB-Cr1+ S. maltophilia RAS-Cr1), Consortium 3(C. tropicalis RETL-Cr1+ S. maltophilia RAS-Cr1+ P. aeruginosa BAS-Cr1), Consortium 4 (C. tropicalis RETL-Cr1+ C. violaceumMAB-Cr1+ P. aeruginosa BAS-Cr1) consisted with three bacterial strains whereas Consortium 5(ReTOS-Cr1+ BAS-Cr + RAS-Cr1+ RETL-Cr1+ MAB-Cr1) with five bacterial strains and Control plot (Natural attenuation) consisted of indigenous microbial in the soil as a control plot. The rates of biodegradation of oil sludge were studied for a period of three months and periodic sampling of soil from each bioreactor was carried out at 7 days of interval. Analysis of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon (TPH) was done along with physiochemical parameters such as pH, moisture content and microbial population (CFUs) in the soil. The results obtained revealed biodegradation of oil sludge contaminated soil in all set treatments were much higher than Control plot (NA) by 12.1 fold. The bioreactor augmented with Consortium 4 proved to be a better performance with 94% of TPH removal followed by Consortium 2 (91.6%), Consortium 5 (90.1%), Consortium 1 (90%), Consortium 3 (87.5%) and Control plot (27.4%) respectively. The variations of physiochemical parameters that influence the reduction of oil sludge in the soil were also discussed in this paper. It was noted that, the continuous supplied of oxygen from aerated static pile (ASP) into the soil showed a good prospects in bioremediation of oil sludge

    Time:
    11:20 - 11:45

    Title: Carbon capture and storage on circum-Antarctic seabeds in a changing climate

    David K A Barnes
    British Antarctic Survey, United Kingdom

    Biography
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    Biography

    David K A Barnes
    British Antarctic Survey, United Kingdom

    Dr. David Barnes is a marine ecologist at British Antarctic Survey, NERC and teaches at the University of Cambridge (UK). He has worked in polar marine science, focusing on continental shelf benthos, for 27 years and has published 240 scientific papers. Most recently, he is working on quantifying blue carbon in cold waters, it’s tempero-spatial variability and power as a negative feedback on climate change – on the Antarctic Circumnavigation Expedition and NERC funded projects, Changing Arctic Ocean Seabed and ICEBERGs – see www.asccc.co.uk.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    David K A Barnes
    British Antarctic Survey, United Kingdom

    Life on the seabed, on continental shelves around Antarctica, can be globally important in immobilizing organic and inorganic carbon. Although their turnover of carbon cycling is low compared with oceanographic carbon storage or water column pelagos (e.g. zooplankton), the storage, burial and thus potential for sequestration is high, but little understood or quantified to date. Carbon storage by benthic animals around West Antarctica’s continental shelves, estimated at 106 tonnes per year, has increased in response to climate change and shows seasonal, annual and between-region variation. Quantifying this variation should reduce error in CO2 pathway models. SubAntarctic island shelves are likely to be even more important benthic carbon stocks because of more considerable phytoplankton blooms, little or no sea ice and warmer sea temperatures than Antarctica (enabling faster meal processing time, and thus growth rates by benthos). Their potential as a carbon sink is almost unknown but new projects on the Antarctic Circumnavigation Expedition (ACE) and ICEBERGs have been sampling these shelf benthos using bespoke camera landers, video and photo-equipped trawls and cores. These are enabling estimation of changes in intra and inter-shelf variability in benthos carbon storage. Growth models constructed from age structure of sampled species with growth check lines (e.g. bryozoans, bivalves, brachiopods and corals) enable carbon accumulation to be estimated across seasons and years. We are constructing seabed carbon capture and storage budgets in a rapidly changing part of the world that may represent one of the most important global negative feedbacks on climate change.

    Time:
    11:45 - 12:10

    Title: Tackling the Global Warming and Climate Change Issues in Australia

    Ayesha Saeed
    Consultants GeoEnvironment, Australia

    Biography
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    Biography

    Ayesha Saeed
    Consultants GeoEnvironment, Australia

    Dr Ayesha Saeed is a geoscientist with expertise in geochemistry. She is from Sydney Australia. She did MSc Geology (Pakistan), MSc thesis on Murry Basin Australia (University of NSW), PhD in geochemistry (Auckland University, New Zealand). She spends a decade in research related to exploration of mineral and precious stones using state of the art techniques at Macquarie University, Australia. In the last five years she changes her focus and utilizes her expertise for improving climate and environmental conditions. She worked with Pakistani Universities targeting alternate energy options. And now involved in environment related projects and products.



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    Abstract

    Ayesha Saeed
    Consultants GeoEnvironment, Australia

    Environmentalists are not the only ones stressing the realities of climate change; the effects can be seen in the political, economic and social behaviour of the country. Political issue: polarization noted in the views of Australian public. Main parties in Australia have different opinions but now general public is more aware of climate change. Economic issue: Small farmers felt the effects; agriculture sectors covered 61% of Australia. Climate change has worsened the matters related to farmers. Changes in production patterns due to higher temperatures, extreme and changing precipitation patterns threaten crops. This affects food supplies and increase volatility in food prices. The low cost greenhouse is design to help the poorest farmers. Rural and urban poor are the hardest hit: We are trying to improve poverty and inequality for decades, which will get worse with climate change. No resources to cope with the effects of extreme flooding or droughts will only displace or change the way of life of the disadvantaged. Australia provides monetary help to poor at the time of need; the best is to prevent such needs. Social issues: Women, children, and the elderly will become even more vulnerable from climate change. It will increase the amount of work load for women and heat related ailments will be increased in elderly and children. Fortunately the medical system in Australia provides a lot of help. Communities will be forced to relocate as they are exposed to rising sea levels, drought puts strain on resources and extreme rainfall becomes the norm.

    Time:
    12:10 - 12:35

    Title: Climate Change, Water Tracks and Soil Piping: Two Case Studies from Sub-Arctic Alaska

    Debasmita Misra
    University of Alaska Fairbanks, USA

    Biography
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    Biography

    Debasmita Misra
    University of Alaska Fairbanks, USA

    Debasmita (Debu) Misra was born in the state of Odisha in India. He completed his B. Tech. in Agricultural Engineering in 1984 from India and M. Eng. in Water Resources Engineering in 1986 from the Asian Institute of Technology (AIT). After a year of graduate studies in Engineering Hydrology at the University College Galway, Ireland, he joined Ph.D. at the University of Minnesota in 1988 in the field of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, which he completed in 1994. He is currently a Professor of Geological Engineering at UAF. He teaches undergraduate courses in subsurface hydrology, remote sensing for engineering, senior design and graduate courses in unsaturated or saturated groundwater flow and contaminant transport in subsurface. His research is focused on non-isothermal fluid dynamics in soils and its impact on transport processes.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Debasmita Misra
    University of Alaska Fairbanks, USA

    When constrained by subsurface boundaries such as permafrost, clay, or bedrock, drainage water flows through the soil, channelizing into features known as “water tracks”. Water tracks indicate an immature hydrological network and are widely found in the Arctic and Sub-Arctic due to the prevalence of permafrost. Despite their abundance, there is a lack of understanding of water track characteristics and their interplay with the surrounding bio-geophysical environment. In addition, water track impacts on the northern landscapes due to the warming climate makes it critical to study. An observed impact is increased subsidence with the progress of water track. Another major cause of soil subsidence in the Arctic is soil piping. Soil piping could be induced due to geology, slope, soil texture, hydraulic and thermal properties, and frost. The interaction of water tracks with soil pipes have caused significant subsidence in Martins’ property near Fairbanks, Alaska. These subsidence patterns have progressed steadily and rapidly to threaten the foundation of their house. Hence, the first objective of our study is to examine and characterize the interplay between soil pipes and water tracks to assess the factors that are responsible for soil subsidence. We have collected soil temperature, moisture, and intrinsic permeability data along and across a prominent water track and a few soil pipes in Martins’ property. We have used thermal infrared images over a period of time to study the changes in thermal regime of the water track and the soil pipes. We have mapped the geology of the area using well logs to assess the role of geology and slope. Our second objective is to develop a method to map existing water tracks on Goldstream Road near Fairbanks to investigate whether it intensifies the road damage when the flow in water tracks is blocked by the road foundation. Goldstream Road is known to have extensive and recurring damage, some of which are likely amplified by water track interceptions. Mendbayar et al. (2016) have observed water tracks intercepting the road and have collected soil temperature and hydraulic data at one water track crosscut by Goldstream Road. Geophysical data along the road have been procured in 2012 and 2016 by state agencies. However, no method is existent in mapping such narrow water tracks in densely vegetated areas. We used a DEM from a high-resolution aerial photograph to correlate it with the geophysical and hydraulic data. We mapped vegetation index around Goldstream Road using high-resolution satellite imagery to identify water tracks that influenced moisture availability to plants. Climate change may have induced both of these scenarios but the two case studies are still in progress, and we will present the progress and conclusions drawn from our study thus far.

    Time:
    12:35 - 13:00

    Lunch-13:00 - 14:00

    Title: Climate Change Risk Analysis for Vishakhapatnam, A Port City in the Eastern Coast of India, using Geoinformatics Technology

    Somnath Mahapatra
    Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, India

    Biography
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    Biography

    Somnath Mahapatra
    Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, India

    Somnath Mahapatra is a senior Scientist, associated with Monsoon Mission program and the International CLIVAR Monsoon Project Office (ICMPO) at IITM (Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology), Pune, India. His area of interest includes Numerical Weather Prediction, air-sea interactions, coupled ocean-atmosphere dynamical modelling, climate variability & change, etc. and he published papers in these fields. He contributed for implementation of Monsoon Mission program for improving prediction skill of Indian Monsoon by a coupled dynamical model. He has been active in various activities of Indian Meteorological Society. He is an adjunct faculty of DASS, S. P. Pune University for teaching their post-graduate students.



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    Abstract

    Somnath Mahapatra
    Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, India

    “Geoinformatics” is an interdisciplinary branch, encompassing the latest technologies with the most dynamic & innovative tool for mapping, monitoring, modelling, assessment and defensible management of various environmental issues and natural resources by its specific capabilities and cost effectiveness. It basically utilizes an integration of Remote Sensing (RS), Geographical Information System (GIS), and Global Positioning System (GPS) & also Information Communication Technology (ICT) and other social interactions. Through Geoinformatics, we can study the Earth’s environment as well as its changing trends over the years. This technology can play a vital role in monitoring the land use & land cover (LU/LC) over a particular region and can help to estimate the LU/LC changes over the years, using spatio-temporal data. In this study, the LU/LC change analysis has been done for Vishakhapatnam port ( and its neighbourhood), situated in the Eastern coast of India, over a period of 30 years, with 4 time slots (1988, 1997, 2009 & 2017) during 1988-2017. LU/LC variation due to several features, like human settlement, forest cover, water bodies, vegetation, fallow land, sediments etc. in the coastal areas of Vishakhapatnam & nearby regions have been estimated for the above years (1988, 1997, 2009 & 2017) using USGS data and specific software. This study wished to delineate the flood risk assessment at Visakhapatnam port using Geoinformatics technology and satellite imageries. Shoreline changes and sea level rise in the coastal areas of Vishakhapatnam during the above period have been studied, as these are important for flood risk assessment over the vulnerable areas. From the analysis of sea level rise, it was inferred that the sea level has increased and the shoreline has deviated over the years. By the help of flood mapping through Remote Sensing and GIS, it can be inferred that the Visakhapatnam port areas have been highly prone to flood during recent times. Vishakhapatnam experienced Hud-Hud cyclone in October 2014 and also flood conditions (due to heavy rainfall) in September 2016. These severe events affected the port as well as city areas and there were loss of life and huge damage to properties. These raised the need to address flood related problems through scientific planning, based on studies and detailed researches on extreme weather events and climate change impacts over flood prone areas for formulating possible mitigation measures. In the present study, flood risk assessment shows that a major part of Visakhapatnam port areas fall under medium to high risk zone. Hence, proper coastal management is required for this port.

    Sessions:
    Poster Presentations {P1-P10(14:00-15:00)} {P11-P20(15:00-16:30)}

    Time:

    Title: Political agenda setting in the strategic delta planning of the Mekong Delta -converging views or political heritage induced divergence

    Vo Thi Minh Hoang
    Wageningen University, Netherlands

    Biography
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    Biography

    Vo Thi Minh Hoang
    Wageningen University, Netherlands

    She have experienced 7 years being a lecturer at the University of Science, Vietnam National University Ho Chi Minh City and 2 years being a researcher at the Center of Water Management and Adapting to Climate Change (WACC) – Vietnam National University. Currently, she is a PhD candidate who works as a part of UDW (Urbanizing delta of the Word) – Integrated project on “Strengthening strategic delta planning process in the Netherlands, Bangladesh, Vietnam and beyond”, mainly based on Wageningen University. Her PhD research will focusing on the changes in approaches and related innovative solutions to flood management in long-term Mekong delta processes.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Vo Thi Minh Hoang
    Wageningen University, Netherlands

    The aim of this paper is via the lens of ‘agenda setting’ to explore the degree of convergence/divergence between the development agendas for the Mekong Delta as prevalent among key stakeholder groups and as embedded within the recent developed Mekong Delta Plan (MDP). The MDP sets out a strategic agenda for the development choices of the Vietnamese Mekong Delta (VMD) that is economic attractive, climate adaptive and environmental sustainable. This agenda at times consciously and explicitly departs from historic trends and current practices and practically explores the options and opportunities available within the delta to confront the challenges imposed by climate change and economic uncertainty. In order to trace historical embeddedness and institutional and policy inertia, a brief historical analysis of development trajectories is conducted against which stakeholders’ expressed goals can be reflected. Four groups have been discerned and approached: (1) policy-makers; (2) national experts; (3) practitioners; (4) international donors. Whereas a clear convergence of agendas between stakeholders’ agendas and the MDP can be discerned, these are certainly not uniform and to the same degree across all stakeholders - nuanceations and divergences can be found across all groups, divergence is also clearly prevalent. The latter can be traced to institutional affiliation and geographical position (situated in or outside the delta). As far as strategic delta planning and political agenda setting are concerned, the MDP has certainly made inroads in aligning political development agendas, but this is not uniform and across the board, and as such not a done deal yet.

    Time:

    Title: Diagenesis effect on deeply buried high quality reservoir sandstone of Shahejie Formation in Nanpu sag, Bohai bay Basin, East China

    Muhammad Kashif
    China University of Petroleum, China

    Biography
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    Biography

    Muhammad Kashif
    China University of Petroleum, China

    Muhammad Kashif, from Pakistan. Bachelor in Geology, master in Petroleum geology, M.Phil. Sedimentology from University of the Punjab, Lahore Pakistan. And currently studying Ph.D. in Petroleum and reservoir geology from University of Petroleum East China. Main research area is Petroleum geology, sedimentology and reservoir characteristics of clastic rock especially Chinese Basins.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Muhammad Kashif
    China University of Petroleum, China

    Digenesis has a significant impact on reservoir quality in deeply buried formations. Sandstone unit (Es1 Member) of Nanpu Sag, Bohai Bay Basin, is a typical deeply buried sandstone with large hydrocarbons accumulation. The methodology includes core and thin section observation, Fluorescence, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), cathode luminescence (CL), fluid inclusion and isotope testing and electron probing analysis as well as quantitative determination of reservoir characteristics. The sandstones of the study area are medium to coarse-grained, moderate to well sorted lithic arkose and feldspathic litharenite. Porosity and permeability values range from 0.5% to 30% and 0.006mD to 7000mD respectively. The diagenetic history reveals a mixed episode of diagenesis and deep burial followed by uplift. Main diagenetic events include compaction, cementation alteration, dissolution of unstable minerals and grains fracturing. Diagenetic modifications were dependent on grains composition, and burial depth. Compaction resulted in densification and significantly reduced the primary porosity. Quartz, calcite, and clay are more dominant pore occluding cement and occur as euhedral to subhedral crystals. Alteration and dissolution of volcanic lithic fragments and pressure solution of feldspar grains were the main sources of quartz cement whereas carbonate cement is derived from an external source. Clay minerals resulted from the alteration of feldspar and volcanic lithic fragments. Porosity and permeability data predicts good inverse relationship with cement. On the contrary, leaching of metastable grains, dissolution of cement and at some places formation of pore-lining chlorite enhanced the reservoir quality. Best reservoir portion is thicker sandstone bodies, medium to coarse-grained, well-sorted sandstone with low primary ductile grains and containing a small amount of calcite cement. The present study shows several diagenetic changes in the Es1 member, but the overall reservoir quality is preserved.

    Time:

    Title: Geology of Muglad Rift Basin of Interior Sudan

    Hassan Ahmed
    University of Ibadan, Nigeria.

    Biography
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    Biography

    Hassan Ahmed
    University of Ibadan, Nigeria.

    Ahmed Hassan completed his Bachelor of Sciences (B.Sc.) in Petroleum Geology, University of Khartoum, Sudan from 2005-2010. One year on job training as Petroleum Exploration Geologist, Ministry of Petroleum, Sudan. He worked four years as Operation Geologist at China National Logging Corporation from 2011-2015. One year as a Part Timer Teaching Assistant at Geology Department, University of Khartoum, Sudan. He is currently a Master of Sciences student at Geology Department, University of Ibadan, Nigeria.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Hassan Ahmed
    University of Ibadan, Nigeria.

    The Muglad rift basin of interior Sudan is an integral part of the WCARS. It has undergone a polyphase development which has resulted in three major phases of extension with intervening periods (unconformities) when uplift and erosion or non-deposition have taken place. The depositional environment is nonmarine environment ranging from fluvial to lacustrine. The basin has probably undergone periods of transtensional deformation from the rhomb fault geometry seen in the basin. Changes in plate motions have been recorded in great detail by the stratigraphy and fault geometries within the basin and the contiguous basins. The rift basin has commercial reserve of petroleum, with both Cretaceous and Tertiary petroleum systems active. The major exploration risk is the lateral seal and locally the effect of the tectonic rejuvenation as well as tectonic inversion. In some, oilfields the volcanic rocks constitute a major challenge to seismic imaging and interpretation.

    Time:

    Title: Maastrichtian-Danian oil shales from Jordan - sedimentology and depositional environment

    Ibtisam Mohamed Derwish Beik
    Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany

    Biography
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    Biography

    Ibtisam Mohamed Derwish Beik
    Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany

    Ibtisam Beik is a doctorate candidate at the Ruhr - University Bochum, Institute for Geology, Mineralogy and Geophysics, Germany. She received her master’s degree in Geology from the University of Jordan. Recently, she published “Microfacies and depositional environment of Late Cretaceous to Early Paleocene oil shales from Jordan”, Arabian Journal of Geosciences (July, 2017). Her current research is mainly focused on oil shale deposits from Jordan, their sedimentology, depositional setting and environment.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Ibtisam Mohamed Derwish Beik
    Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany

    Surface and near-surface oil shale occurrences are well known from central and northern Jordan. The successions are mainly composed of bituminous marls with various amounts of quartz, phyllosilicates and apatite. Previous age determinations based on benthic and planktic foraminifera dated the oil shales as late Campanian to early Maastrichtian. Recently, major deep oil shale occurrences have been discovered across the country. The discovery prompted a set of studies aiming to better understand the timing of their deposition and their environmental setting. Calcareous nannofossils revealed ages ranging from Maastrichtian to middle Eocene. Here, we present the results from core logging and petrographic analyses of Maastrichtian-Danian deposits. Two sections (190 m and 125 m) representing oil shales from the Jafr and Azraq-Hamza basins in southeast and central-east Jordan, respectively, were examined. Oil shale deposition is preceded by dolo-mudstones and burrowed phosclastic mudstones indicating a restricted, yet dynamic, inner-ramp environment. Laminated and burrowed foraminiferal mudstones and wackestones dominate the oil shale successions suggesting a calm reducing environment within the mid- to outer-ramp. The Maastrichtian-Paleogene boundary is not recorded; the Danian interval is underlain by unique layers of phosooidal grainstones. This implies sea level regression following the KPg boundary and deposition in a shallower setting. Stable isotope data (δ13Ccarb and δ18Ocarb) from both sections were examined and compared with the TOC record. Major Maastrichtian and Danian carbon excursion events were detected despite the alteration effect caused by organic matter oxidation. Meanwhile, the δ18Ocarb records reveal minor temperature changes during each of the time intervals.

    Time:

    Title: A Microfluidic Framework of Studying Displacement Efficiency Via Cyclic Injection

    Seon-Ok KIM
    Pukyong National University, South Korea

    Biography
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    Biography

    Seon-Ok KIM
    Pukyong National University, South Korea



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Seon-Ok KIM
    Pukyong National University, South Korea

    Geological CO2 sequestration is an important approach to reduce CO2 emission into the atmosphere by isolating a large amount of CO2 in underground geological formation. Such an approach involves injecting supercritical CO2 into porous formation saturated brine and causes scCO2 flooding with immiscible displacement. The displacement efficiency of CO2 in porous formation is determined by hydraulic properties of the porous media and interfacial properties of CO2 and brine in affecting CO2 migration and pore water displacement. The objectives of this experimental study is to observe the displacement patterns of immiscible fluids through microscopic pore structure in microfluidic chips and to estimate displacement efficiency of an injecting fluid over the course of multiple drainage-imbibition cycles. In this study, cyclic injection experiments by applying n-hexane used as a proxy fluid of scCO2 were conducted to investigate cyclic displacement pattern of n-hexane and water and the change of displacement efficiency according to the cycle. In order to quantitatively analyze migration of fluids by cyclic injection in pore network, the image of displacement patterns and distribution of n-hexane and pore water are acquired through an imaging system with a microscope. The experimental observation results could provide an understanding to predict the behavior and distribution of CO2 and pore water by reservoir environmental conditions and drainage-imbibition cycles

    Time:

    Title: Measuring Ash Content in Coal using Portable X-Ray Fluorescence

    A. K. Somarin
    Brandon University, Canada

    Biography
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    Biography

    A. K. Somarin
    Brandon University, Canada

    Dr. A.K. Somarin is currently the Chair of the Department of Geology at Brandon University. He done his Ph.D. in Economic Geology from 1995-1999 at University of New England, New South Wales, Australia. He done his Post-docin Economic Geology from 2004-2006 at Lakehead University, Ontario, Canada. He is an Expert and pioneer in developing uses of portable XRF in various fields of Earth and Environmental Sciences. Conducting research in application of portable XRF in hard rock mining and oil and gas exploration and production; geochemistry and petrogenesis of plutonic and volcanic rocks; ore deposit geology and hydrothermal alteration; stable isotope geochemistry.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    A. K. Somarin
    Brandon University, Canada

    Coal based industries have been critical to the development of the modern world and is likely to be significant in the future. The principal uses of coal are electricity generation and steel manufacture with heating and fuels making up the remainder. Use ofcoal can have some negative effects caused by the penalty elements. These elements are specific elements that occur in trace amounts but are regulated by emission standards due to the adverse effects they have on the humans and environment. Ash produced during coal combustion can cause some problems as well. Portable x-ray fluorescence (PXRF)is a technique that has various applications in mining, environmental, oil and gas industries. This study was carried out to examine and extend the application of this analytical technique to coal samples, for the purpose of determining their ash content using geochemical proxies, without needing conventional methods. Current coal ash analytical methods are costly, destructive, time consuming, require complex sample preparation and equipment. PXRF technology allows for increased geochemical knowledge within shorter timeframes and greater cost-effectiveness. This type of geochemical analysis can also be used for the detection of penalty elements in coal. Ash content is one of the important features of coal and it needs to be determined before using coal in any industry. High ash content coal causes boiler fouling and slagging problems. In this research, theoretical ash content was calculated for 51 sub-bituminous and bituminous coal samples sourced from New Zealand, Canada and the USA. The actual ash content of the samples ranged from 2.8% to 27.41%. Theoretical ash content was based on the PXRF results formajor constituents of coal and the various oxides that compose coal ash. Iterations of the equations used the various components were applied in order to find the greatest correlation between the theoretical and actual ash content of the coals. The optimal equation involved the summated values of 8 oxides detected in the coal. The correlation between the theoretical and actual ash content was 92% and the equation calculated, on average, the theoretical ash percentage to within 1.14% of the actual ash content of the coal samples.

    Time:

    Title: Potential Occurrence Assessment of Acid Rock Drainage through a Geochemical Stream Sediment Survey

    Joo Sung Ahn
    Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), Korea

    Biography
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    Biography

    Joo Sung Ahn
    Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), Korea

    Dr. Joo Sung Ahn is the Director of Geo-Environmental Hazard Research Center of KIGAM. He received Ph.D. (2000) in Environmental Geochemistry from Seoul National University, Korea. His research interests are geochemical investigation and remediation of contaminated environments. Currently, he focuses on research center operations and research project management.



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    Abstract

    Joo Sung Ahn
    Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), Korea

    During large constructions of roads or structures, unexpected acid rock drainage (ARD) can be caused by local mineralization containing sulfides in the geology. The potential of ARD occurrence of a certain area sometimes must be assessed before initiation of any engineering earth works. In this study, a new prediction protocol using a geochemical exploration survey technique of stream sediment is proposed. Sediment samples were collected at the case study area, and the contents of some major and heavy metal elements were compared according to the major geologies of the sampling points. The modified geoaccumulation indices (Igeo) of Fe, Pb and As could indicate a possible zone of pyrophyllite mineralization, which may cause the occurrence of ARD at the study area. Using the enrichment index of the three elements relative to the median values of the area, a high potential zone of ARD could be designated, which was in agreement with the laboratory ARD prediction tests of the rock samples. In the other areas with different mineralization processes, other metallic elements can be selected as indicators of the ARD potential. Likewise, the potential of the occurrence of ARD at an area can be assessed by evaluating the geochemical distributions and drawing the indicator elements for ARD through a stream sediment survey.

    Time:

    Title: Deformation mechanisms of consequent bedding rockslides in southwest China

    Guotao Ma
    The University of Warwick, United Kingdom

    Biography
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    Biography

    Guotao Ma
    The University of Warwick, United Kingdom

    Guotao Ma, PhD candidate at University of Warwick. Start 2017. Ma was born in Chengdu city, China, in 1990. He completed his Bachelor degree of Engineering in 2013 and obtained his first class Master degree of Engineering in Geological Engineering from Southwest Jiaotong University in China in 2016. His Master dissertation is focused on the reliability analysis of landslide in Tibet plateau by using Monte-Carlo simulation and numerical modelling. After his master degree, he worked as a teaching assistant in the Southwest Jiaotong University and collaborated with China Geology Survey to do some research about the failure mechanism of consequent bedding rockslides. At the same time, he visited the University of Canterbury to do academic research in New Zealand. In 2016, he was selected to attend IRALL School which was held by the state key laboratory in China. Currently, He is pursuing his PhD degree in the research direction on the reliability and stability analysis of engineering slopes and landslides



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Guotao Ma
    The University of Warwick, United Kingdom

    Two deadly rockslides, triggered by heavy precipitation and open-pit mining, were reported in Emei County, Sichuan Province, China, from 2011 to 2015. About 6.0 million m3 of rock detached from the upper slopes, pushed the pre-sliding deposits, and hit the opposite mountains at average velocity of 18 km/h to 36 km/h. Detailed field investigation, geological mapping and UAV aerial photographic interpretation are presented to analyze the failure mechanisms of the events. The results suggest that the high-speed consequent bedding rockslides were triggered by the failure of rock mass, which were influenced by the engineering activities and climate change. Key contributive factors were weathered and fragmented basalts that were affected by open-pit mining and frequent blasting, as well as the weak underlying tuffs with swell-shrink potential. Persistent rainfall was the direct trigger in initiating and reactivating the landslide. Water affected the slope stability by increasing the slope material’s unit weight and penetrating into joints and cracks to make the tuffs degrade and causing a reduction in effective stress. The mechanisms for the two landslide events, are a high-speed regressive consequent bedding (RCB) rockslide in 2011 and a reactivated high-speed advancing consequent bedding (ACB) rockslide in 2015. This paper can provide an insight into large-scale consequent bedding rockslides associated with the interaction between the rainfall and open-pit mining slopes instabilities.

    Time:

    Title: The Failure Mechanism of the Yanwotou Landslide

    Zhiming Chao
    University of Warwick, United Kingdom

    Biography
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    Biography

    Zhiming Chao
    University of Warwick, United Kingdom

    Zhiming Chao, PhD candidate at University of Warwick. Start 2017. Chao was born in Anhui Province, China, in 1991. He completed his Bachelor degree of Engineering Management in 2014 and obtained his first class Master degree of Engineering in Harbour, Costal and Offshore Engineering from Hohai University in China in 2017. His Master dissertation is focused on the permeability of dense rock and soil by conducting laboratory experiments and numerical modelling. Currently, He is pursuing his PhD degree in the research direction on the mechanical properties of unsaturated soil under cycle dynamic loading.



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    Abstract

    Zhiming Chao
    University of Warwick, United Kingdom

    The paper is studied failure mechanism on the case of Yanwotou Landslide Group. The groundwater is the main cause of the unstable slope after analyzing on lithology and deformation features based on the detailed investigation. The calculation and evaluation of slope stability have been conducted under different kinds of working conditions. And the failure mechanism have been adopted according to the results. It will provide beneficial reference to the control of such kinds of unstable slope and further study of it.

    Time:

    Title: Authigenic Mineralogy in Nubian Sandstone Reservoirs

    Mohamed M. A. Rahoma
    Libyan Petroleum Institute, Libya

    Biography
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    Biography

    Mohamed M. A. Rahoma
    Libyan Petroleum Institute, Libya

    Mohamed Rahoma is a sedimentologist. He works for Libyan Petroleum Institute since 2004 in geology department. He participated in many sedimentological studies of many oil companies operating in the country for the purpose of evaluating the oil capabilities of their reservoirs. He got a chance to improve his experience in geology of reservoirs when his company sent him to Durham University in United Kingdom in 2010. He have also visited many outcrops in the country for research studies projects which his department did in order to correlate the outcrop formation with subsurface formation for different oil fields.



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    Abstract

    Mohamed M. A. Rahoma
    Libyan Petroleum Institute, Libya

    The reservoir characteristics of the sandstones are discussed in terms of the factors influenced the reservoir quality during diagenesis processes which are cements and clays. The effects of these factors have been understood in more details during sedimentological, petrographical and scanning electron microscope studies, which indicate authigenic clays and authigenic cements, have an importance influence on the reservoirs productivity. Authigenic clays occur as pore linings, pore fillings, and fracture fillings. Sandstones also contain allogenic clays. Allogenic clays originate as terrigenous material (dispersed matrix, or shale clasts) or are introduced subsequent to deposition as a result of bioturbation or infiltration. An authigenic origin can be established on the basis of clay composition, morphology and sandstone textural properties. Distinctions between authigenic and allogenic clays become difficult if either is extensively deformed by burial or tectonism. Studies of authigenic clays utilizing a combination of thin-section, scanning electron microscope, and x-ray diffraction show that each of the major clay groups exhibit a limited number of distinctive morphologies. Smectite occurs as highly wrinkled pore linings. Kaolinite most commonly form pore-filling books of stacked pseudohexagonal flakes. Chlorite occurs primarily as pore-lining pseudohexagonal flakes, or rosette arrangement. These types of clays blocked the primary and secondary pores and affected the reservoir potential by converting intergranular macro pores to micro porosity and reducing permeability. Quartz Overgrowth considered the most important type of authigenic cements that affects the pores in this study as result of dissolution of Silica that released by one or more diagenetic processes that apparently are controlled by temperature with time and re-deposit in other location as overgrowth cement. This kind of cement blocked the pore space and affected the reservoir quality. It is recommended to give these authigenic minerals more investigation in future studies since they have essential influence on potential of sandstones reservoirs.

    Time:

    Title: The Reservoir Rock Properties of Heybeli Geothermal Area

    Ahmet YILDIZ
    Afyon Kocatepe University, Turkey

    Biography
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    Biography

    Ahmet YILDIZ
    Afyon Kocatepe University, Turkey

    Ahmet Yıldız is a Professor in the Department of Geological Engineering, Engineering Faculty at the Afyon Kocatepe University. He completed his undergraduate and Ph.D. at Suleyman Demirel University. His research interests lie in the area of ore deposits, geochemistry, geothermal and petrography of marble deposits. He is instructor for properties and analyses methods of industrial minerals, exploration techniques of ore deposits and geothermal. He is still the Dean of Engineering Faculty. He is married and has two children.



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    Abstract

    Ahmet YILDIZ
    Afyon Kocatepe University, Turkey

    Heybeli geothermal area is located at 25 km southeast of Afyonkarahisar province (West Anatolia/Turkey). It is one of the most important geothermal sites in the region. There are one thermal spring and eight thermal wells, were drilled by governmental agencies and private companies, with a depth between 240 to 650 meters. Thermal water has been utilised for greenhouse heating and thermal tourism. Temperature and electrical conductivity (EC) values of thermal waters are within the range of 29.3°C to 54.7°C and 587 to 3580 µmho/cm, respectively. Thermal waters are of the Na-Ca-HCO3 and Na-Ca-HCO3-SO4 type. The basement rocks in the study area are Paleozoic aged Afyon metasedimentary group, consisting of schists and recrystallized limestones. This basement is overlain by Senozoic marl-conglomerate-sandstone-mudstone, trachyandesite and alluvium units. Limestones are dark gray coloured, properly medium and thick bedded. The XRD studies show that the rock is entirely composed of calcite mineral. It has been observed in polarizing microscope studies that the calcite minerals are in a microcrystalline structure and ferrous melts locally migrate along fracture-crack planes. XRF analyzes have shown that the rock contains about 55% CaO and some elements such as Na-Fe-Al-Si are present in the rock in small quantities. These carbonate rocks, controlled by faults and karstic structures, offer reservoir rock properties for the thermal waters in the region. The meteoric waters percolate through to these carbonate rocks via by majör faults and fractures, then heated with geoterhmal gradient and ascend to the surfaces as thermal waters. Key Words: Heybeli, geothermal, reservoir rock, mineralogy and petrography

    Time:

    Title: Palaeoseismology on the Bolvadin Fault: E idence for Tectonic Creep in Afyon-Akşehir Graben, Western Anatolia

    Çağlar Özkaymak
    Afyon Kocatepe University, Turkey

    Biography
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    Biography

    Çağlar Özkaymak
    Afyon Kocatepe University, Turkey

    Çağlar Özkaymak is a Turkish geologist. His training is in geology, active tectonics, paleoseismology, and tectonic geomorpholgy. After graduating from the Hacettepe University, Turkey in 2000, he recevied his master of science degree from the Yüzüncü Yıl Üniversity, Turkey in 2003. He completed his doctorate at Dokuz Eylül University, Turkey in 2012, underthesupervision of Dr. Hasan Sözbilirwith a thesis on “Active TectonicsandSeismicity of the Manisa Basin, western Anatolia, Turkey”. Dokuz Eylül University honored him with Science Honour Award and Publication Honour Award in 2012. He is also being awarded the 2011 year Golden Hammer Research Award by the Chamber of Geological Engineers of Turkey for their work on a paleoseismology of the Manisa Fault Zone, Manisa, Turkey. He also worked and studied geosciences in some top rated universities around the world, including Université Blaise Pascal, France, Universität Bern, ETH Zurich, Switzerland. Çağlar Özkaymak is currently on thefaculty at Afyon Kocatepe University Department of Geological Engineering as associate professor of Geology. He is also a director of the Earthquake Research and Application Center of Afyon Kocatepe University since 2015.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Çağlar Özkaymak
    Afyon Kocatepe University, Turkey

    Aksehir-Simav Fault Systemwhich is one of the major seismogenic sources of western Anatolia, contains a number of discrete active normal fault zones trending NW-SE. These fault zone shave caused the formation of grabens, such as NW-SE-trending Afyon-Akşehir Graben (AAG) representing the southeastern part of Akşehir-Simav Fault System. Historical and instrumental earthquake records suggest the existence of a large number of earthquakes that created surface ruptures in thissystem. Thelastestone of themoccurred on 3 February 2002 (Mw: 6.5and 6.0) in 130 km-long AAG. The epicenters were located in the middlepart of the graben, south of Bolvadin city.Northern border of the graben is controlledby NE-SW-trending, 15-km-long active Bolvadin normal fault. One of theprominentexamples of surface deformations that have been formed without a destructive earthquake failure since last 10-20 years in the western Anatolia, observed in Bolvadin settlementarea. Alongthe NE-SW-striking progressive surface deformations whose length varies between 800 metersand 3 kilometers, vertical displacements vary between 10-50 cm. In this study, we mapped that surface deformations at a scale of 1/5000 and performed the trench-based palaeoseismological investigations on the eformationline in order to find out the effect of active tectonism on the formation of surface deformations. Trench studies reveals that surface deformations follow the previous Holoceneruptures of Bolvadin Fault. According to the paleoseismologic and geodesic data, measured rates of vertical offset in Bolvadin is 8.5 and 7.1 cm/y, respectively. This study is supported by the Scientific and Technical Research Council of Turkey (TÜBİTAK, projectno: 115Y246) and partly by Afyon Kocatepe University Scientific Research (BAP) Project of 16.KARIYER.167.

    Time:

    Title: Mineralogical-Petrographical and Physical-Mechanical Properties of Büyük Karabağ Marble from Bolvadin, Afyonkarahisar, Turkey

    Ahmet YILDIZ
    Afyon Kocatepe University, Turkey

    Biography
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    Biography

    Ahmet YILDIZ
    Afyon Kocatepe University, Turkey

    Ahmet Yıldız is a Professor in the Department of Geological Engineering, Engineering Faculty at the Afyon Kocatepe University. He completed his undergraduate and Ph.D. at Suleyman Demirel University. His research interests lie in the area of ore deposits, geochemistry, geothermal and petrography of marble deposits. He is instructor for properties and analyses methods of industrial minerals, exploration techniques of ore deposits and geothermal. He is still the Dean of Engineering Faculty. He is married and has two children.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Ahmet YILDIZ
    Afyon Kocatepe University, Turkey

    One of the well-known marble sites in Turkey outcrops around the İscehisar, Afyonkarahisar region, which is also one of the major marble production and processing centre in Turkey. The İscehisar marble is Paleozoic in age and were formed as a result of regional metamorphism. On the other hand, little focus has been on middle-upper Triassic aged Büyük Karabağ marble, outcropping 55 km east of Bolvadin city in Afyonkarahisar, with respect to the geological and mechanical properties. The aim of this study is to reveal the geological, mineralogical-petrographical, geochemical, physical and mechanical properties of Büyük Karabağ marbles by using the polarized light microscope and methods of major element analyses, volumic mass, density, water absorption, porosity, compressive strength and strength tests after natural freezing effects. Finding indicates that N55W/30NE-directed marble beds have white, greyish white, green and cream colors and include yellowish fissures, the stratified structure. Büyük Karabağ marble beds have variable thickness of 6cm and 3m. The polarized light microscope studies show that marble is mainly made up of calcite crystals with a granoblastic texture and include accessory minerals such as limonite, hematite and chlorite. The type, quantity and distribution of these accessory minerals change colours and appearances of marbles. The CaO content ranges between %44.72 and 48.06; MgO %4.18 and 10.97; total Fe2O3 %2.21 and 4.72; SiO2 %0.21 and 4.20 in Büyük Karabağ marbles. According to calculations in this study, volumic mass is 2.71gr/cm3, density is 2.73gr/cm3, the percent of water absorption is %0.31, the percent of porosity is %0.51, compressive strength is 505,76kg/cm2, strength after natural freezing effects is 486,44kg/cm2 and the percent of weight loss after natural freezing test is %0.12. Our results suggest that Büyük Karabağ marble has similar properties with İscehisar marble in context of geological characteristics, reserve, mineralogical-petrographical, geochemical, physical and mechanical features and have a potential to become an alternative marble production centre to the İscehisar.

    Time:

    Title: The Investigation of The Physico-Mechanical Properties of Iscehisar (Afyonkarahisar) Marbles

    Metin BAĞCI
    Afyon Kocatepe University, Turkey

    Biography
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    Biography

    Metin BAĞCI
    Afyon Kocatepe University, Turkey

    MetinBağcı is a AsistantProfessor in the Department of Geological Engineering, Engineering Faculty at the Afyon Kocatepe University. He completed his undergraduate and Ph.D. at Suleyman Demirel University. His research is engaged in areas such as mineralogical petrographic and geochemical features of marbles. He still teaches geology lessons at engineering faculty and works on marble projects. He is married and has two children.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Metin BAĞCI
    Afyon Kocatepe University, Turkey

    Iscehisar marbles located within Afyonmetasedimanter rocks are found as two lenses in approximately 3.5 km KD of Iscehisar district. Iscehisar Marble is very important in terms of marble sector of our country. Iscehisar Marbles processing BC 3000 began in the Roman Empire period, especially after the 1980s as a result of the development of technological development of marble production has been observed in the region.Iscehisar Marbles are located in the form of lenses in the schists in the north east of Afyonkarahisar province. The basement rocks of the region consist of Paleozoic aged schists. Iscehisar Marbles are located on these basement rocks. According to the difference in color and texture, the production of marble types known as Kaplan, Gray, Violet, Honey and Sugar is performed. In the scope of the study, unit volume weight (%), apparent density (%), water content (%), water absorption (%), porosity (%), void ratio (%), ultrasonic (m / and resistance (%). In addition, mechanical tests such as uniaxial compressive strength (MPa), point loading, bending strength, abrasion resistance and mass after freeze-thawing and pressure loss test were performed on samples representing marble levels. According to the physico-mechanical findings obtained, Iscehisar marbles are suitable to be used as floor stone and covering stone in indoor and outdoor areas according to TS EN 1910, TS EN2513 and TS EN 10449 test standards.

    Time:

    Title: Kinematic Analysis and Fault Geometry of Erkmen Fault, Western Border of Afyon-Akşehir Graben, Western Anatolia

    Çağlar Özkaymak
    Afyon Kocatepe University, Turkey

    Biography
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    Biography

    Çağlar Özkaymak
    Afyon Kocatepe University, Turkey

    Çağlar Özkaymak is a Turkish geologist. His training is in geology, active tectonics, paleoseismology, and tectonic geomorpholgy. After graduating from the Hacettepe University, Turkey in 2000, he recevied his master of science degree from the Yüzüncü Yıl Üniversity, Turkey in 2003. He completed his doctorate at Dokuz Eylül University, Turkey in 2012, underthesupervision of Dr. Hasan Sözbilirwith a thesis on “Active TectonicsandSeismicity of the Manisa Basin, western Anatolia, Turkey”. Dokuz Eylül University honored him with Science Honour Award and Publication Honour Award in 2012. He is also being awarded the 2011 year Golden Hammer Research Award by the Chamber of Geological Engineers of Turkey for their work on a paleoseismology of the Manisa Fault Zone, Manisa, Turkey. He also worked and studied geosciences in some top rated universities around the world, including Université Blaise Pascal, France, Universität Bern, ETH Zurich, Switzerland. Çağlar Özkaymak is currently on thefaculty at Afyon Kocatepe University Department of Geological Engineering as associate professor of Geology. He is also a director of the Earthquake Research and Application Center of Afyon Kocatepe University since 2015.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Çağlar Özkaymak
    Afyon Kocatepe University, Turkey

    Abstract Afyon-Akşehir Graben (AAG) is located in the south eastern part of Akşehir-Simav FaultSystem, which is one of the activ edepression area in West Anatolian Extensional Province. Modern geometry of Afyon Basin, which represents the western sector of AAG is controlled by many normal fault segments, namely Erkmen Fault, Gecek Fault, Gazlıgöl Fault, Karahisar Fault and Yarımca Fault. Two main geothermal fields in Afyon Basinare at Ömer-Gecek and Gazlıgöl containing reservoirs of water with temperatures upto 130º C, which are located on the junction points of Gecek-Erkmen Faultsand Gazlıgöl-Yarımca Faults, respectively. This suggest that most of these normal faults also play a key role in extensional domain type geothermal system in Afyon Basin. This study involves use of geological mapping and kinematic analyses methods for the first time, to identify the kinematic behaviour and structural geometry of Erkmen Fault representing the western border of the Afyon Basin. Mapping studies indicate that 11 km-long Erkmen Faultconsists of parallel-sub parallel northeast facingfault segments which juxt apose Miocene volcanic rocks and the Quaternary graben fill, in general. Field data also indicates that the analysed fault segments of Erkmen Fault are linearand could generate earthquakes with magnitudes of 6.3. Theresult of kinematic analyses suggests that the NNW–SSE trending obliqueto normal faulting is consistent with a ENE–WSW extension alstressregime in western part of the Afyon Basin. This study is supported by Afyon Kocatepe University Scientific Research (BAP) Project of 17.KARIYER.207 Keywords: West Anatolia, Afyon Akşehir Graben, kinematicanalyses, Erkmen Fault

    Time:

    Title: Mineralogical and Petrographical Properties of Aslanapa Marblefrom Kütahya Turkey

    Metin BAĞCI
    Afyon Kocatepe University, Turkey

    Biography
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    Biography

    Metin BAĞCI
    Afyon Kocatepe University, Turkey

    Metin Bağcı is a Assistant Professor in the Department of Geological Engineering, Engineering Faculty at the Afyon Kocatepe University. He completed his undergraduate and Ph.D. at Suleyman Demirel University. His research is engaged in areas such as mineralogical petrographic and geochemical features of marbles. He still teaches geology lessons at engineering faculty and works on marble projects. He is married and has two children.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Metin BAĞCI
    Afyon Kocatepe University, Turkey

    Aslanapa is located 39 km southwest of Kütahya. In the north-western part of the Tauride-Anatolian Block, marble beds showing different color, texture and pattern characteristics are observed in the between Aslanapa, Çavdarhisar and Altıntaş (Kütahya).The Palaeozoicaged Afyon Metamorphics are the olde strocks in the study area. Afyon Metamorphics are composed of schists, quartzites and marbles. Ophiolitic rocks are settled on tectonic contact over the basement rocks. The ophiolites are formed by the closure of the northern part of the Tethys. The Jura-Cretaceousa geddolomitic limestones are unconformably over lain on the lower units.The Miocene-Pliocenelacustrine limestones and terrestrial clastics are located on the lower units. In these quarries mostly white colored and yellow-green and violet veined marbles types are produced. In the scope of the study, the detailed geological, mineralogical, petrographic and physical features of these marbles produced were tried to be determined. Polarizing microscope and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis techniques were used in the mineralogical studies. As a result; different mineral compositions were determined in marbles as; Quartz + Calcite in yellow veined marble, Mica + Calcite in green veined marble and Opaque Mineral + Calcite + Chlorite in violetvein marble.

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    Title: Evaluation for the Scco2 Sealing Capacity of the Mudstone in the Janggi Basin, Korea

    Jeongpil An
    Pukyong National University, South Korea

    Biography
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    Biography

    Jeongpil An
    Pukyong National University, South Korea



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    Abstract

    Jeongpil An
    Pukyong National University, South Korea

    The scCO2(supercritical CO2) sealing capacity of the mudstone as a cap-rock in the Janggi basin, Korea was evaluated, measuring the initial scCO2 injection pressure.The mudstone core (4.2 cm in diameter and 5 cm in length) was fixed in a stainless steel cell covered with a heating jacket to maintain at 50 oC, and then was saturated with distilled water at 100 bar to simulate the scCO2storage conditions under the subsurface. The scCO2was contacted to the surface of the mudstone core in the cell using a syringe pump at the range of 100 - 250 bar until the scCO2 began to penetrate into the water-saturated mudstone core, and the initial injection pressure of scCO2 into the mudstone was measured.From the experiment, the initial scCO2 injection pressure of the mudstone core was 240 bar (ΔP=140 bar), which was much higher than that of the tuff in Janggi basin (ΔP=15 bar), suggesting that the mudstone in Janggi basin was more suitable than the tuff to prevent the scCO2 leakage from the scCO2 storage rock.The amount of the scCO2 replacing water in pore spaces of the mudstone core was measured to estimate the scCO2 storage capacity of the mudstone. After more than 3 pore volumes of the scCO2 was flushed out from the mudstone core, the scCO2 storage ratio was calculated from the amount of water drained out from the mudstone core. The conglomerate was considered as a provisional the scCO2 storage rock in Janggi basin, and its average scCO2 storage ratio was measured as 31.21%. In this study, the average scCO2 storage ratio of the mudstonewas calculated as 11.24 %, which was lower than that of the conglomerate in Janggi basin.By considering the high initial scCO2injection pressure and the lowscCO2storage ratio, the mudstone in Janggi basin could be the successful cap-rock to shield the scCO2 leakage from the scCO2 storage rock in the Korea.

    Time:

    Title: Biomarker Characteristics of Source Rocks and Oil-Source Correlation in Baxian Sag, Bohai Bay Basin, China

    Fan Yang
    China University of Petroleum, china

    Biography
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    Biography

    Fan Yang
    China University of Petroleum, china

    YANG Fan, PHD candidate, is mainly engaged in petroleum geology and geochemistry. He has expertise in petroleum geology and geochemistry in improving the petroleum exploration. His distinguishable biomarker associations of source rocks has been successfully applied to Baxian sag and adjacent Raoyang sagand creates more strict way to build up oil-source correlation. he has built this method after years of experience in research, experimenting both in lab and oil field.



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    Abstract

    Fan Yang
    China University of Petroleum, china

    Baxian sag is one of the most petroliferous sags in Bohai Bay basin, So far more than 3×108 tons of oil has been found. The previous studies lack the research of biomarker distinction among four possible source rock intervals (E3s1L, E2s3M, E2s3L, E2s4). The complicated accumulation patterns and mix of oils result in the ambiguous oil-source correlation. The inadequate work impedes the future fine exploration. The purpose of this study is to distinguish the biomarker characteristics, interpret the deposited environments and organic matter input of source rocks and clarify the oil-source correlation and petroleum distribution. The study on source rocks was based on the biomarkers gotten by GC and GC-MS. We divided the origin genetic types of oil through hierarchical cluster analysis, setup the oil-source relationship and discussed the distribution of each type of oil which are based on the knowledge of petroleum geology and petroleum geochemistry. E3s1L was deposited in anoxic environments with minor terrestrial organic matter input, E2s3M in sub-oxic to anoxic with medium terrestrial organic matter input, E2s3L in sub-oxic with medium terrestrial organic matter input and E2s4 in sub-oxic with significant terrestrial organic matter input. Three oil families derived from E2s4, E2s3L, E3s1L, respectively, and three types of mixed oils have been identified. Each source rock interval has distinctive biomarker associations. Each type of oil has its own distribution characteristic, and it is mainly controlled by the areal distribution and the thermal evolution condition of source rocks. Such a petroleum distribution pattern has important implications for future exploration. There is considerable exploration potential for E2s3M and E2s3L -derived oils in the Baxian sag, and traps close to or within the generative kitchens have better chance to contain oils generated from the E2s3M and E2s3L.

    Time:

    Title: The Expression of the Multistage Evolution of the Pegmatitic Magma in the Licungo Pegmatite Field, Zambézia, Mozambique

    Marcelino Moiana
    National Museum of Geology, Mozambique

    Biography
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    Biography

    Marcelino Moiana
    National Museum of Geology, Mozambique

    Marcelino Moiana obtained a PhD in geology in 2016 and MSc in geology in 2008 at University of Minho, Portugal. He is now working on research on internal structure and paragenesis of pegmatites located in northern and Central Mozambique. He is also engaged in the research of geosites, followed by a proposal of relevant ones to be declared Geological Heritage by the national entities.



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    Abstract

    Marcelino Moiana
    National Museum of Geology, Mozambique

    The Licungo Pegmatite Field (LPF) is a cluster of pegmatite lenses aligned along NNE-SSW, NNW-SSE and WNW-ESE regional fractures. This field is hosted in Mesoproterozoic terranes, represented by orthogneisses, paragneisses interlayered with carbonate rocks and amphibolites. Their microscope observation reveals widespread sericitization of Ca-plagioclase in orthogneisses. Besides quartz and pethite (>90%), the pegmatites are composed of accessory beryl, garnet, monazite and columbite-tantalite. In the backscattered electrons image, the garnet is concentrically zoned, showing: i) a core zone dominated by the spessartine component associated with albite, zircon and rutile, being the later enriched in Nb, Th and U, common in magmas of alkaline affinity; ii) an intermediate zone with relatively high content of grossular component, resulting probably for contamination by paragneisses or representing influx of Ca, into LPF, released during plagioclase sericitization; and iii) an outer zone with progressive increase in Mn/Fe ratio towards the outermost margin, representing the crystal growth by fractionation. The filling of columbite-tantalite fractures by U-Ca-microlite supports the suggested contamination hypothesis. In the other hand, the monazite composition clusters in three populations: i) population 1 shows the highest contents of light rare earth elements (LREE), high P and low Si, corresponding probably to the formation of early stage monazite; ii) population 2 shows the highest Sm, Gd and U content resulting from the referred contamination and iii) population 3 shows the highest Si, Th and the lowest LREE corresponding, probably, to the fractionation towards the formation of thorite, found associated with monazite. The above paragenesis and chemical data distribution suggest multistage evolution of the pegmatitic magma. Key-words: Licungo Pegmatite Field, Mozambique, zone, garnet, columbite-tantalite, monazite.

    Time:

    Title: Palaeozoic Structural Style in Libya: The Qarqaf Arch a Palaeo-Transfer Fault Zone Between the Ghadamis and Murzuk Basins

    Mahmoud Ali Benissa
    Libyan Petroleum Institute, Libya

    Biography
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    Biography

    Mahmoud Ali Benissa
    Libyan Petroleum Institute, Libya

    Mahmoud Ali Benissa was born in 18th Nov, 1989. He completed his PhD at University of Paris VI (France) in 2010. He completed his Masters degree in University of Paris VI (France) in 2002. Now he is working in Libyan Petroleum Institute. He is the Member of the Geological Society of Libya, since 1988



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Mahmoud Ali Benissa
    Libyan Petroleum Institute, Libya

    This paper analyses the Palaeozoic structural style in the Qarqaf arch, a N75°E-trending anticlinorium separating the Ghadamis basin (north) from the Murzuk basin (south), in NW Libya. Methodology is based on remote sensing analysis associated to fieldwork, in the frame of Geographic Information System (GIS). In optical, radar and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) imagery each litho-stratigraphic unit has image facies that complement the more classical field facies, permitting to update geological maps of the western end of the arch. One of the most important results is to evidence a ‘Bir Aishah’ anticline, and the Wadi Ash Shabiyat block forming a graben, not a horst. Our updated maps show major faults, long dykes, joints, and short dykes related to tension fractures that had opened once and were subsequently filled by on-going sedimentation. 0ur field structural analysis focuses on the movements at each mapped fault, with special interest in horizontal components. A continuous brittle syn-depositional deformation occurred throughout the Palaeozoic. It started with a relatively high density fracturing, comprising mainly tension fractures and minor open faults, together with joints. Afterward, fractures progressively ceased to be active, and those that continued their activity are now major faults. The Qarqaf arch is a Palaeozoic right-lateral zone, comprising conjugate families, respectively N80°E right-lateral and N110°E left-lateral strike-slip faults. It also comprises ~N-striking extensional faults, bounding tilted blocks. The Bir Aishah anticline is regarded not as a compression fold but as a drag fold related to normal faulting mechanism, bordering a graben block. At regional scale, we propose for the Palaeozoic time a tectonic model of extensional basins linked by a paleo-transfer fault zone, which strike-slip mechanism is responsible for formation of the arch. However, this model may seem contradictory with the observation of folds in the Devono-Carboniferous layers outcropping immediately north of the arch closure. We then argue that soft Devono-Carboniferous deposits slid at the end of their deposition by decollement over tilting monoclinal Devonian layers. This interpretation implies that compression occurred only inside the sliding mass. It is then not contradictory with the tectonic model proposed at regional scale. We finally question the supposed major Hercynian orogen that is generally considered to have affected the area at the end of the Palaeozoic. We also argue that the large tectonic event dated by the regional disconformity well known in the area is not the “Hercynian age” one, which should be late Carboniferous, but a Triassic one, related to the opening of the Neotethys (early Tethyan event).

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